Lemur Tree Frog


ORDER: Anura

FAMILY: Hylidae

GENUS: Hylomantis

SPECIES: lemur

DESCRIPTION:
Thin, frail-looking frog which lacks much muscular structure. Males are 1.5 inches in length; females 2 inches. Light lime green to lemon yellow while resting; darker green with reddish flecks or uniform red dorsal coloration when active. Large bulging eyes with a white iris surrounded by a black ring. Pupil is horizontal. No webbing between the toes.

GEOGRAPHICAL RANGE AND HABITAT:
Humid lowland and montane primary forest from 440 to 1600 meters in Colombia, Costa Rica, and Panama.

DIET:
Carnivorous. Insects and other arthropods.

LIFE CYCLE/SOCIAL STRUCTURE:
Nocturnal. Makes few jumps, but instead moves by slow hand-over-hand climbing. Males call to females from plant positions over water. Clutches (up to 35 eggs) are deposited on a leaf and after hatching, the larva fall into the water below.

SPECIAL ADAPTATIONS:
Pads on digital tips for climbing. Coloration change from bright green during day to darker at night helps with camouflage from predators.

INTERPRETIVE INFORMATION:
Hylomantis is a genus of tree frogs. The word lemur comes from the Latin word "lemures" which means "spirits" or "ghosts". It probably refers to the nocturnal habits, stealthy movements and large eyes in both the Madagascar mammal and this frog.

OUR ANIMALS:
The Lemur Leaf Frogs can be found in the RAD room in the Wayne and Gladys Valley Children's Zoo

STATUS IN WILD:
Listed as Critically Endangered by the IUCN due to loss of habitat and chytridiomycosis, a fungus disease that can kill up to 90% of the amphibians in a stream. Amphibians in captivity can be cured with a fungicide, but applying fungicide to an entire watershed would kill beneficial fungi as well. There are captive breeding programs at several institutions, including the Bristol Zoo and the Atlanta Botanical Gardens.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

  1. Gooch, A.F. Latin Names Explained. 1995. Facts on File, Inc., p. 505
  2. Internet: WAFA:World Association of Zoos and Aquariums United for Conservation; Science Buzz; Google Books; Wikipedia.
  3. Showler, Dave. Frogs and Toads. 2004. St.Martin

Birds

Amphibians

Arthropods

Reptiles

Mammals