Snared! How
by | June 13th, 2016

In the Budongo Forests of Uganda, a large group of chimpanzees attempt to thrive in their natural habitat, eating plants and small prey. At the same time, humans who live around the forest are also trying to survive, working at places like the local sugarcane plantation and living in straw and mud houses. For food, they set out into the forest with small snares and aim for duiker and pig.

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Most of these snares are made from wire. As chimpanzees walk through the forest, their hands or feet may become trapped in the snare. In two of the forests where chimpanzees are studied, researchers have observed up to thirty percent of chimpanzees are maimed due to snare injuries. More die.

This problem is typical all over the world. How do elephants and people live together, or mountain lions and the people of the Bay Area? Though solutions seem impossible at times, we are inspired by the imagination behind the Budongo Snare Removal Project.

In January 2000, the Jane Goodall Institute in collaboration with the Budongo Forest Project initiated a snare removal program in the Budongo Forest Reserve. The objective was to reduce the number of snares set, reduce the number of animals caught in snares and traps, and increase the number of local people who obey wildlife laws and understand the need for protecting wildlife.

Teams of two men locate and remove snares. After the first year of operation, they found that the number of snares being set within the grid Wire snare cherie 2system of the research area dropped.

An education center reaches out to the local community and provides education around ecology, wildlife and the treasure that is the chimpanzees. A nanny goat program rounds out the project, offering ex-poachers an opportunity to raise milk, meat and money for their families in exchange for a promise to cease the use of snares.

Oakland Zoo adopted this project in 2001 and the support covers the salaries for four field assistants, two educators, two eco-guards, the nanny goat program and allowances for transportation, bike repair, gum boots, rain gear, backpacks, and compasses. The zoo is the only supporter of this project. We are proud of its compassion and respect for both animals, people and the entire ecosystem.

Please help these chimpanzee and join us for our annual Discovering Primates Gala on September 24th for delicious snacks, drinks, an exciting silent auction and special guest.

 

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