Archive for the ‘Conservation’ Category

Deep Dive

by | January 2nd, 2014

I live for a night like this. It is a perfectly warm and still after an evening rain, there was a beautiful sunset and a magnificent full moon, we are on a gorgeous island in the Celebus Sea. How can this be my last night in the wilds of Borneo? Visiting Mabul Island has been the cherry on top of an expedition that went beyond my greatest expectations. Today, we got to truly witness the wonders of the oceans. Some of us went scuba diving, but most of us snorkeled in the reefs and outer islands around Mabul. It is no-wonder this area around Sipidan Island is rated as a world-class dive site.IMG_4907

Some of the group had never seen such underwater wonders and it was a joy to witness the reactions, such as “I’m in a fish tank! “ and “how can this be real?”. Indeed, there were fish of every color, shape and size, like cigar fish that seemed to stand on their tails, bobbing up and down as they moved, parrott fish who you could hear munching on their lunches, lion fish and harlequin sweetlip fish, peacock rabbit fish and even a ray. You cannot help but respect the ocean after you have seen the wild beauty of a coral reef world.

I am so happy that Intrepid Travel, our travel company, chose Scuba Junkie’ Mabul Beach Resort as our place to stay, because on top of the beauty of the habitat, we got to learn about their excellent conservation work. Roan, their conservation manager, gave us an impromptu presentation on the challenges facing sharks due to shark finning and all that they are doing to help with Project AWARE. IMG_4897

We were so inspired, that late this afternoon we spent a few hours combing the beach for garbage. The island is challenged by this issue due to garbage washing in from the open sea, and to the many nomadic people who are currently living on the island. Scuba Junkie is working with them to do better when it comes to throwing away garbage – and it made me think of the challenges on my own street in Oakland, California – not so very different. Joining them in their beach clean-up efforts felt great.IMG_7871 IMG_7849

It is late and most of the group has lumbered off to bed. We spent the night in joyful competition with other divers in a trivia night that raised funds for the victims of the typhoon (we did not win). We also gave toasts to a wonderful expedition.  Toasts were made to the rain, to the orangutans, to the sun bears, to the leeches, to the ocean, to the forest, to our incredible luck at viewing wildlife, to the flying squirrels, to the inspiring people and to the feeling of having been part of something that only happens once in a lifetime. I toasted to Oakland Zoo, for employing me to help wildlife in Borneo and around the world and for allowing me to give others the gift of experiencing the wildlife first hand. It’s been another deep dive conservation expedition that changes lives.

 

Out to Sea with Sea Turtles

by | December 23rd, 2013

We spent last night in the town of Sandakan which used to be the capitol of North Borneo. It is nice to get needed provisions and have a good sleep. It was especially great that we all got to have dinner with Siew Te Wong, the founder of the Bornean Sun Bear Conservation Centre and bombarded him with questions that he answered with humor and grace. We are very excited to spend time at the center later this week.

This morning we had an adventurous boat ride into the Sulu Sea to Turtle Island. Turtle Islands Park is located 40 km north of Sandakan and consist of tree islands, Pulau Selingaan, Pulau Bakkungaan Kecil and Pulau Gulisan. The park is known for its protection of the nesting of two endangered species of the sea turtle, the green turtle (Chelonia mydas) and the smaller hawksbill (Eretmochelys imbricata). The two turtle species lay their eggs here year-round.

This afternoon was free beach time and everyone had a ball snorkeling in the clear waters and relaxing in the sand. As only 50 people can come to the conservation island per night, it was a peaceful and relaxing experience. We all got to see one of my favorite sea creatures, the Christmas tree worms, a very bright and colorful polycheates, or marine burrowing worm.IMG_7316

Finally, after dinner and a film about the program, the announcement was made, “It’s Turtle Time!”. We followed the turtle team into the night and onto the beach where a huge mama green turtle had crawled up and dug herself a trench. We watched in awe as she laid around 100 wet, white eggs that looked like ping pong balls.  The staff collected the eggs and took them to a hatchery, where they buried them and labeled the nest. This keeps them safe from feeding reptiles, or other turtle mamas laying their own eggs.IMG_7348

Next, we walked to the edge of the sea and lined up behind a drawn line in the sand, cameras at the ready. In the arms of the staff was a laundry basket filled with a new clutch of hatchlings. They squirmed about all over each other, waiting for the moment when they were let loose. The basket was gently tipped over, and out they scrambled. As a conservationist, I am not allowed to use the word “cute”, but WOW — it was hard not to pick one up and give it a kiss for good luck. Instead, we did get to steer a few wayward ones towards the sea, but in general, the 100 babies knew exactly where they were going.

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I am now writing by headlamp, Lovesong fast asleep. Another big day in Borneo! I can’t help but marvel over the wild miracles of nature. After those babies enter the big sea, they experience the “lost years”, and only 1% will survive long enough to return to lay eggs themselves. We were told they navigate through crystals  in their heads that work as a magnetic compass. These are the mysteries of nature. I couldn’t dream up more miraculous stuff.

Into the Jungle…

by | December 19th, 2013

Another day up before the sun and we sleepily gulp down our cups of tea as we wait for our boats. Our guides from Red Ape Encounters greet us once again, and we push off shore and down the windy, lush tributaries of the Kinabatangan River. I can’t believe we get to do this again! Everywhere, we hear animals – and we decide to just sit a moment and look up at the trees and listen. Someone notices a snake coiled up on a branch directly above us; a gorgeous reticulated python, just minding his own business. As we snap photos and contemplate his age, the snake suddenly springs uncoiled into the river, missing our boat by inches. We are awake now! IMG_4650

 

Ken and our other guides steer our boat through a beautiful stretch of river and to a place where most tourists cannot tread, into the HUTAN-KOCP orang-utan study site. The HUTAN – KOCP’s (Kinabatangan Orang-utan Conservation Project) work in Sabah began in 1998 with the first ever study of wild populations of orang-utans living in previously logged forest (secondary forest).  Our boat drifts slowly under a few very creatively designed rope bridges, made to connect fragmented corridors for orangutans. Orangutans do not swim, nor leap – and the lack of a large tree canopy makes it impossible for them to cross over the river. The bridges are the solution –  and it is a thrill to look up at them and imagine the red apes walking over them, gaining access to the food, shelter and other orangutans on the other side. IMG_4641

 

We pull up to the shore and in small groups, we climb out and into the jungle. Armed with Mosie Guard (bug spray) and leech socks, we are hoping that leeches are not part of the wildlife that we view today. We climb up a steep hill to a hidden cave where birds nest soup has been harvested from swiftlets and marvel at the richness of the forest. After a strenuous hike, we emerge out of the forest to find coffee and snacks laid out for us by the river. Life is good. IMG_4620

 

Seeing animals is a thrill, but meeting people who are heroes for animals is just as exciting and inspiring. It is wonderful to watch our group engage with these fellow-humans. Some of our group is now up in a tree-hide, talking with orangutan researchers as they stay out of the rain and safe from meandering pygmy elephants. IMG_4673Some of our group is out with reforestation workers who are planting trees all over the Kinabatangan River.  How great to meet the people who are part of the on-the-ground solutions. What a morning! As we finally jump back in our boats, we notice that behind much of the beautiful foliage, we can see rows of the palm kernel tree where there was once a diverse forest.  There is a lot to learn about conservation challenges in Borneo…..

In Search of Orangutans

by | December 17th, 2013

It’s 4:00  in the morning and the rain is pounding. This is not California rain. This is rainforest rain –the sky has unleashed water and just when you thought it could not rain harder, it does. My alarm goes off and Lovesong, my co-leader and I arise. Amazingly, as the sun comes up, the downpour subsides, and yellow rays come through our bungalow window at the Proboscis Lodge on the Kinabatangan River in Sabah, Borneo. It is an honor to be leading an Oakland Zoo Conservation Expedition to this fascinating part of the planet.

Lovesong, our 13 expedition participants and I have a quick tea and step carefully into the boats awaiting us. We are spending the day with Red Ape Encounters, and are armed with bird books, mammal guides, cameras and binoculars. Our lead guide Ken greets us with a big smile.IMG_7293

First, we listen. The sound of the rainforest in the morning is incredible: such a variety of calls echo across the river. One of our guides can identify the bird species by sound and delights our bird-loving crew. Looking around, we see tall and lacy fig trees, lush vines dripping down 90 feet and light purple flowers blooming high on treetops.  There are so many shades of green.

There, high up in a tree, we spot three white-crowned hornbills. These birds are huge and beautiful, and resemble rock stars with their fancy white feathers poofing from their heads. Two sit on a branch and one swings merrily from a vine, seemingly for the sheer fun of it.

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A large group of Proboscis Monkeys has alighted on a few trees right in front of us and we sit for at least an hour and watch them. Only found in Borneo, these primates are quite unique with their protruding noses, pot bellies and comical sounds. They leap about, always respecting the obviously dominant male.

As the morning heats up, we see silver languar (silver leaf) monkeys, long-tail macaques, a variety of hornbills, and a bird called a jerdon’s baza with a whole rat in his talons.

Our guides steer us to our ultimate hope: an orangutan. In a fig tree, casually snacking we see a mother and her baby, and a fully flanged (with cheek pads) male. We learn that Orang means “man” and Hutan means “forest” in Malay, and we can see why they are named as such. We are now living the dream, and watching these magnificent apes, their red hair lit by the equatorial sun, just being animals in the habitat they were born in. What an amazing day. And it is only 9:00 am.

 

 

Attention Future Biologists!

by | November 11th, 2013

MollyAtBeachHave you ever wanted to know what it’s like to be a real field biologist, studying wildlife in the great outdoors? What exactly do they do out there with all that cool equipment, anyway? Now, there’s an easy way to find out. Oakland Zoo is proud to introduce its latest educational program, the Field Biology Workshops, where we focus on modern, innovative techniques of field biology and conservation. If you’re a middle or high school student, this could be your opportunity to try your hand at this rewarding career while you’re still in school. And you don’t even have to go anywhere—the Zoo brings it all to your classroom.

The San Diego Institute for Conservation Research (ICR), who offers a summer program for science educators looking to institute their own science programs, was instrumental in helping to get this program off the ground. During a three-day conservation institute for teachers held by ICR, members of the Zoo’s education staff had the opportunity to learn the curriculum and were provided with teaching materials to get started

Here’s how it works. During our engaging one or two-day in-class workshops (an hour each) you’ll get the chance to use modern technology to study wildlife, analyzing real data collected in the field. A good example is with our condor program, the field study that uses GPS technology to track endangered California condors released back into the wild in Baja California and the Ventana Wilderness Area near Big Sur. As a young aspiring scientist, you’ll be asked to analyze data and give thought to the conservation challenges that these animals face in the real world. Using satellite mapping techniques, you’ll study and analyze the condors’ geographic range and make your own decisions about ways to protect it. One of the exercises involves the planning for a proposed wind farm within the condors’ habitat. Based on your analysis of the data, your job is to advise the company on the best place to locate the facility to minimize risk to the birds while still serving the needs of the public.

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One of the goals of the Field Biology Workshops is skill-building. We ask the students to come up with answers to these problems; not necessarily focusing on the right answer, but getting the students to think and work like a scientist. Through this program the Zoo is hoping to expand its educational reach by bridging the demographic between its ZooSchool, Teen Wild Guide and ZooMobile programs, offering educational services to students in middle and high schools. The program is still in the planning stages but we’re hoping to be up and running this school year. To find out more about the Field Biology Workshops, please call our Teen Programs Manager, Melinda Sievert at (510) 632-9525 ext 201. So if you’re a middle or high school student who’s interested in biology or if you know someone who is, give Oakland Zoo a call and get that young scientist onboard with the new Field Biology Workshops. See you at the Zoo!

Toys needed for Sun Bears in Borneo
(Oakland Zoo Conservation Program)

by | October 21st, 2013
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A rescued Sunbear at the Bornean sunbear conservation Center gets to relax in her basket.

The Bornean Sun Bear Conservation Centre, located in the Malaysian state of Sabah on the island of Borneo, rescues sun bears and seeks to rehabilitate bears that may be suitable to return to the wild.

 

Most of the 28 bears in residence at the Centre are victims of the illegal pet trade….mother bears are killed by poachers for their body parts (paws, bile from the gall bladder) and orphaned cubs are often captured and spend their lives in small bare cages without adequate space or proper diet. Many of the bears at the Centre have never walked on grass or been able to climb a tree, a tragedy for these very arboreal bears. The Centre currently has one new bear house built in

Enjoying a new ball

Enjoying a new ball

2010 attached to one hectare (2.5 acres) of forest enclosure, and is in the process of adding a second bear house and forest enclosure. A visitor centre, viewing platform and guest walkway connecting visitors with nearby Sepilok Orangutan Rehabilitation Centre, are all due to be completed in early 2014. Please visit the BSBCC website at www.bsbcc.org.my to learn more and find out how you can support the extraordinary work being done to save the world’s smallest bear species”.

 

 

Pagi, one of Oakland Zoo's sunbears enjoying her Kong.

Pagi, one of Oakland Zoo’s sunbears enjoying her Kong.

Through our fundraising efforts, our support of the BSBCC helps to fund completion of the much-needed rehabilitation facility in Sabah. Oakland Zoo’s own veterinarians have travelled to Malaysia to provide hands-on assistance in moving and providing medical care to the Sun Bears currently being rehabilitated by the BSBCC. Now, on October 31st, Oakland Zoo staff is leading a trip to Borneo very soon and they will be visiting the Bornean Sun Bear Conservation Centre. The bears at the center have been rescued as orphans due to poaching and often from the illegal pet trade. In fact, our bear, Ting Ting, was one of those cubs as were both parents of Bulan and Pagi.  The staff at the center would love to be able to provide their bears with “Kong” toys such as Pagi is enjoying. Here at Oakland Zoo, Pagi Bear is enjoying her “Kong” toy enrichment. and our zoo travelers are willing to pack such toys in their luggage for the trip.

Can you help out the bears at the Bornean Sun Bear Conservation Centre by purchasing an Extra Large “Kong” toy to send along with them?

You may purchase these and more on Amazon.com.  Just click here for the items specifically requested for the bears and make sure it will arrive by October 31st.  Thank you for caring about sun bears.