Archive for the ‘Events’ Category

A Visit to the Doctor: Touring Oakland Zoo’s Veterinary Hospital

by | October 30th, 2015
Oakland Zoo's Veterinary Hospital

Oakland Zoo’s Veterinary Hospital

Wouldn’t it be nice if all the animals  at Oakland Zoo could take care of themselves, leading perfectly healthy lives on their own? Of course it would.  But the reality is that zoo animals, just like us humans, need occasional help to stay healthy.  That’s where the OZVH comes in. The newly built $10 million Oakland Zoo Veterinary Hospital provides comprehensive diagnostic care and treatment for creatures both great and small. Radiology, lab work, surgery, treatment, and recovery—all phases of veterinary care can be handled within this 17,000 square foot Gold LEED certified facility. This hospital has been a dream for Zoo President,  Dr. Joel Parrott, who has been working hard to make it a reality ever since he began working at Oakland Zoo. Visiting veterinarians at other AZA institutions to learn what works and what doesn’t, he and the architectural team were able to come up with a design that incorporated the latest technologies and procedures in the most efficient manner.

Generally, our hospital is not open to the public, so the majority of zoo visitors probably don’t even know of its existence. But thanks to the Zoo’s Education Department, it’s now possible for a limited number of guests

X-Ray Facilities

X-Ray Facilities

to visit this wonderful new facility. For the past two years Chantal Burnett, our Assistant Program Director of Volunteer Services, has been leading walking tours of the hospital. In that time, these hour-long tours have become so popular that she’s had to train a team of six docents to handle the demand. I recently had the opportunity to tag along on one of these tours. Although I’ve worked at the Zoo for many years and have been there many times, I was able to learn some new things about the facility that’s been touted as one of the finest veterinary hospitals in Northern California.

On this particular tour I was in the company of some women from the Taiwan tourist industry as well as some members of the Zoo’s Marketing department. Predictably, we began our tour at the

Large Animal Treatment Area

Large Animal Treatment Area

front door. But then Chantal led us through the facility via the same route that an ailing zoo animal would follow, providing us with a unique perspective.

Our first stop was Radiology, where animals are bought in for x-rays. Housed within lead-shielded walls, separate equipment for taking vertical as well as horizontal x-rays accommodate a variety of diagnostic situations.  Of all our animal residents, only elephants and giraffes are too large to be treated here at the hospital. In those cases, the vet staff has the ability to bring whatever equipment they need to the animals’ exhibits, for a “house call.”

Then it was on to Treatment, where multiple procedures can take place simultaneously, in the two adjacent rooms. Included in this area is equipment for anesthesia, oxygen, ultrasound and animal dentistry. Skylights augment the electrical lighting; stainless steel surfaces are easily cleaned.  The large folding padded equine table can safely accommodate hoofstock of any size.  Nearby is the scrub area, where the vet staff cleans up in preparation for their work. Also located nearby are the exam kits—plastic tote boxes containing the equipment needed for work in the field.

The Hoofstock Recovery Area provides a quiet environment (straw-covered floor, subdued lighting) for recently treated

Vet Tech Reviewing Information

Vet Tech Reviewing Information

animals to recuperate until they’re ready to return to their exhibits. Down the hall, the Quarantine area allows for the isolation of animals to prevent disease transmission. As a matter of protocol, all animals coming to the Zoo from other institutions are required to be quarantined for thirty days, so this facility is often used for this precautionary purpose as well.  The heated floor and hydraulic doors make this area safe and comfortable for these animals whose stay is generally longer than those being treated for specific health issues.

Various other dedicated areas are conveniently located nearby: a diet prep kitchen to prepare all the meals for the animal guests, a pharmacy, two separate laboratories for testing and research, as well as several rooms to meet the needs of the staff: laundry room, conference room, a kitchen

Visiting Veterinary Eye Specialist

Visiting Veterinary Eye Specialist

and several private and group offices. There’s even a cozy studio apartment that allows a staff member to stay overnight to keep an eye on animals that need frequent observation or care. Everything from the solar paneled roof to the heated floors of this facility helps provide for the needs of our more than 650 animal residents.

If you’re interested in booking a tour to see this wonderful new hospital for yourself, please contact Chantal Burnett at 510-632-9525 ext 209 (Tues- Sat) or email her at cburnett@oaklandzoo.org. Reservations are required. The hour-long tours are available on Wednesdays and Saturdays between 10 am and 12 noon. Tour fees are $20 for members /$25 for non-members. Pre-vet student groups and high school student groups are $200 per 20 students. Maximum number of guests per tour is 20. Hope to see you there!

 

Global March for Elephants and Rhinos 2015: Join us in San Francisco!

by | September 24th, 2015
Join Oakland Zoo and March For Elephants at the global march on October 3rd in San Francisco!

Join Oakland Zoo and March For Elephants at the global march on October 3rd in San Francisco!

Do you want to fight for the survival of elephants and rhinos? Do you want to say no to extinction? Do you want to march and rally? Please join the Global March for Elephants and Rhinos (GMFER), and be a warrior against the illegal wildlife trafficking trade! On Saturday, October 2nd, 3rd, and 4th the world is coming together to take a stand against the ivory and rhino horn trade in over one-hundred and twenty cities across the globe, including Africa, South America, Asia, and Australia!

Did you know that one elephant in Africa dies every fifteen minutes? And one rhino dies every nine hours? That’s 96 elephants and 2-3 rhinos a

Gina Kinzley, Co-Elephant Manager at Oakland Zoo, handing out "96" pins at World Elephant Day at the zoo.

Gina Kinzley, Co-Elephant Manager at Oakland Zoo, handing out “96” pins at World Elephant Day at the zoo.

day. Considering the estimates for elephants are below 400,000 and rhinos below 18,000 in Africa, they don’t have much time left unless we come together in a global effort and ask for change. To read more about the crisis visit my blog here: http://www.oaklandzoo.org/blog/2014/02/10/96-a-day-96-await/. To watch a videos of the previous SF marches look here: http://marchforelephants.org/videos/.

 

March For Elephants, SF based non-profit, lobbying for SB 716 and AB 96. You may have seen some of these fierce warriors tabling at the zoo!

March For Elephants, SF based non-profit, lobbying for SB 716 and AB 96. You may have seen some of these fierce warriors tabling at the zoo!

I have had the pleasure to be a part of March For Elephants, a San Francisco based grassroots organization, consisting of some of the most passionate and fierce advocates I have met, and who care deeply for the survival of elephants. This group of warriors has been working since May of 2013 to raise awareness of the crisis and organize and advertise the upcoming march in San Francisco. This year they became an official 501c3 non-profit organization run solely by volunteers. The march was originally inspired in 2013 by the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, a non-profit dedicated to around the clock care of baby orphan elephants, and who have seen the dramatic increase of poaching in Africa, due to the massive increase in orphans they are rescuing. DSWT supported about fifteen other cities who were marching across the globe, and so many other cities were inspired by their work and passion, over forty cities ended up marching in 2013, San Francisco one of them! That momentum has not died and only continues to grow year after year as elephants and rhinos are still in peril. Over one-hundred and twenty cities, and thousands of advocates are working fiercely on behalf of our beloved elephants and rhinos, and we anticipate the San Francisco turnout to be even bigger and better than last year! Last year we had dozens of NGO supporters, including some of Oakland Zoo’s conservation partners, such as Amboseli Trust for Elephants. Post-march, they have a great line-up of speakers including Ed Stewart, co-founder of Performing Animal Welfare Society, and special youth advocates!

Here’s what to do if you’re interested in attending the San Francisco march:

Global March for Elephants and Rhinos San Francisco 2014. Over 1500 in attendance. Photo courtesy of March For Elephants.

Global March for Elephants and Rhinos San Francisco 2014. Over 1500 in attendance. Photo courtesy of March For Elephants.

Please join Oakland Zoo in support of the Global March for Elephants and

Lobbying and testifying at the Capitol for SB 716 and AB 96. Pictured: PAWS, Oakland Zoo, and HSUS staff.

Lobbying and testifying at the Capitol for SB 716 and AB 96. Pictured: PAWS, Oakland Zoo, and HSUS staff.

Rhinos. Say no to elephants turning into trinkets, jewelry, and status symbols. Say no to rhino horn being used as medicine or a hangover cure. Help us tell China to shut down their carving factories! Help us tell Vietnam that rhino horn has no proven medicinal or hangover cures! Also, don’t forget to call Governor Jerry Brown’s office (https://govnews.ca.gov/gov39mail/mail.php) to let him know you support AB 96 a bill that will shut down ivory sales, and SB 716 a bill to prohibit the use of the bullhook,  in California. Governor Brown has until October 11th to either sign or veto. Oakland Zoo has played an active role in both of these bills. Who knows? Maybe we will be celebrating together on march day. See you there!

Oakland Zoo Supports World Elephant Day

by | July 31st, 2015

On Wednesday August 12th, Oakland Zoo will celebrate World Elephant Day.

World Elephant Day was launched on August 12, 2012, by the Elephant Reintroduction Foundation (ERF), a charitable nonprofit organization based in Thailand, and Patricia Sims, president, producer, and director of Canaz West Pictures Inc., a Canadian-based independent film production company. The ERF was founded in 2002 as a Royal initiative of Her Majesty Queen Sirikit of Thailand. The Elephant Reintroduction Foundation manages three forest sanctuaries in Thailand where, so far, 93 formerly captive elephants have been successfully released back into natural habitat. Check out their website here: http://worldelephantday.org/. WED-LOGOS-CIRCLE-2014-150x150

If you are familiar with Oakland Zoo then you know how passionate we are about elephants and that for the last 19 years in May have been hosting “Celebrating Elephants Day”, to raise funds for Cynthia Moss, founder of Amboseli Trust for Elephants. This year with our day and evening events we were fortunate to outdo ourselves and raise over $40,000 for the elephants and research team that live in Amboseli National Park in Kenya. We also raised several thousand dollars for Big Life Foundation, a new partner, whom particularly focuses on anti-poaching efforts covering two million acres on the Tsavo-Amboseli border. Amboseli and Big Life work together to protect elephants and other wildlife, making our support of the two a unique and cohesive relationship.

96 Elephants a day are being poached in Africa. Join WCS in support of their campaign and take a stand for elephants!

96 Elephants a day are being poached in Africa. Join WCS in support of their campaign and take a stand for elephants!

We would like to honor World Elephant Day as a way to celebrate with the entire world, as well as dozens of other organizations and zoos across the United States and our partners at Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS). WCS created the 96 elephants campaign, recognizing the 96 elephants a day that are poached in Africa for their ivory tusks. This campaign has been critical in raising awareness of the crisis that is going on with elephants. Last month, they hosted an ivory crush in New York, crushing over 1 ton of ivory. In November of 2013, in Colorado, the United States crushed 6 tons of ivory. I am asked all the time “what’s the point ?”. The point is that as a nation we are making a statement. We are saying that the illegal wildlife trade is unacceptable and we will not tolerate it. And eyes are watching. As a leader in this world, other nations are watching, particularly those that are involved heavily in the trade. In the past three years there have been several other crushes conducted, including in China and Africa. In other countries that that have stockpiles, it is costly to protect and monitor these piles, and they are always at the risk of leaking back into the illegal market.

In the past year there have been many pivotal moments for elephants, both good and bad.

Like the domino effect . . . one country crushes or burns their ivory stockpiles and several follow suit.

Like the domino effect . . . one country crushes or burns their ivory stockpiles and several follow suit.

November: New York and New Jersey both pass a state ban to prohibit the selling of all ivory (some minor exemptions made). Several other states are working on similar legislation including California. Oakland Zoo is a sponsoring organization on AB 96 which currently has passed through the Assembly Floor, and is in the Senate Appropriations where it is weighing the fiscal impact to the state.

January 2015: The Natural Resources Defense Council releases a study conducted by elephant ivory expert Daniel Stiles, revealing that up to 90 percent of the ivory in Los Angeles markets is illegal and up to 80 percent of ivory in San Francisco markets is illegal

California is the second largest retail market in illegal ivory sales in the U.S.

California is the second largest retail market in illegal ivory sales in the U.S.

February 2015: The State Forestry Administration of China implemented a one year ban on ivory imports. Taken with criticism, as the domestic trade and all the ivory that is already within country borders is not being regulated, but maybe still possibly a step in the right direction. If anything, all the momentum rallied by other countries has got China’s attention.

March 2015: A study by CSU professor and elephant biologist, George Whittemeyer reveals and confirms that the estimates of about 30,000 or more elephants a year are being poached. Between 2010-2012, 100,000 elephants were killed. At this rate, elephants will be near extinction in less than a decade.

June 2015: In a speech, Zhao Shucong, minister in charge of the state forestry administration, announced that China would “strictly control the ivory trade and processing, until eventually halting commercial processing and the sale of ivory and its products”. Later that month, WCS hosts an ivory crush in New Yorks Times Square and crushes over one ton of confiscated ivory.

June 2015: Recent news according to the Great Elephant Census, founded by Dr. Mike CHase, founder of Elephants Without Borders, confirms that Tanzania has lost over sixty percent of their elephant population in just three years. With over 100,000 in 2009, they now are only home to about 40,000 elephants. The Great Elephant Census is the first continent wide aerial survey of elephants which will give us a more accurate

Lisa dusting. One of my favorite behaviors to observe. Photo by author.

Lisa dusting. One of my favorite behaviors to observe. Photo by author.

and complete idea of elephant populations in each country.

Overall as you can see in the above list and timeline action is happening! But will it happen fast enough and soon enough so that elephants continue to be witnessed in the wild? Will we be the generation to allow extinction to occur to one of the most beautiful and intelligent creatures on this earth? I hope not. Please come and join Oakland Zoo on World Elephant Day to learn about elephants and take action by signing petitions and writing to your legislators. Don’t forget to wear your grey and you’ll get a special “96” pin in honor of the 96 elephants that die every day for their tusks. You’ll also have the opportunity to see real tusks up close, color a special elephant drawing, and take an elphie in front of our cool selfie station!

Making it Green: Oakland Zoo’s Creek and Garden Programs

by | July 17th, 2015

You might not know this but Oakland Zoo deals with a lot more than just animals. Surrounding the Zoo, like a giant green oasis, lies the expansive Knowland Park. And running through the park you’ll find crew with bagsthe meandering Arroyo Viejo Creek, making its way from the East Bay hills to San Leandro Bay. But this creek isn’t some man-made exhibit with fake foliage. It’s a naturally occurring bio zone, complete with its own plant life, animal life and geological features. In other words, it’s home to a lot of living things. And like far too many natural ecosystems, Arroyo Viejo Creek faces ongoing threats from the human world. So it needs a little help. That’s where Oakland Zoo comes in.

For several years now the Zoo has facilitated restoration work on the creek in an effort to return it to its natural, healthy state. This work involves cleaning up accumulated trash, removing invasive plants (such as French Broom, thistle, poison hemlock and English ivy) and planting weed pullersnative species, such as coastal live oak. Most of this work is done by a group known as the Creek Crew, a team of up to fifty zoo-led volunteers that get together one Saturday each month. Armed with shovels, rakes and work gloves, the Creek Crew involves people of all ages, from kids to seniors. And they have a great time too. Overseeing these efforts is Oakland Zoo’s Creek and Garden Programs Manager, Olivia Lott.

A recent arrival at the Zoo, Olivia is also organizing an ambitious plan to create a series of themed demonstration gardens to use in our Education Creek and Garden programs. These gardens will illustrate a variety of biomes and will be used to educate the public about the role of various plant species. Utilizing our existing planter space in the Education Center courtyard, Olivia hopes to create eight different plots, including an edible garden, a medicinal garden, a xeriscaped garden for sun loving plants, a habitat and shelter garden to attract local wildlife, one for shade plants (filled with ferns native to our northern California woodlands) and other gardens for aquatic plants, carnivorous plants and for attracting butterflies and other pollinators. There’s even a group on grassgarden consisting of plants that grow without the need for soil that will be grown vertically along one wall of our Education facility!

Olivia plans to involve the public in creating the space for these gardens. Projects like building planter boxes, vertical garden frames and small fences, plus soil preparation and even some planting can all be fun educational projects for the dedicated groups and individuals who volunteer their time here at the Zoo each month. Education Department staff will maintain the gardens once they are established.

Another conservation project Olivia is helping to launch involves sharing a bit of beautiful Knowland Park with the rest of the East Bay. Starting this September, several groups including Creek and Garden classes, Creek Crew volunteers and Zoo staff will begin collecting acorns that have fallen from the Coast purple and chipsLive Oak trees living in the upper park. The acorns will be brought down to the Education Center to be prepped and planted in containers where they will grow for the next 24 months or so. Once the acorns have become small oak saplings, they will be given to East Bay residents who are interested in helping to re-populate their neighborhoods and yards with these magnificent native trees that once gave Oakland its name. Instructions for caring for the saplings as well as small markers that tell about the trees and where they came from will be provided with each tree. This project grew out of the Zoo’s desire to not only replace the few oak trees that will be removed during CA Trail construction, but to also “spread some of the wealth” of Knowland Park throughout East Bay neighborhoods.

 

If you’re interested in joining the Creek Crew or know someone who is, contact Oakland Zoo at olott@oaklandzoo.org or 510-632-9525 x 233 and get involved with the next work day at Arroyo Viejo Creek. If you’re interested in helping with the gardens, contact Chantal at cburnett@oaklandzoo.org. Either way, you’ll have a great time working with nature and meeting new friends. And it’s a good feeling knowing that you too can make a difference!

 

All Aboard for ZooCamp! What’s New for 2015?

by | June 12th, 2015

It’s that time of year again. That’s right—time for ZooCamp at Oakland Zoo. And this year, along with a lot of perennial favorites, we’ve got several exciting new things happening.

ZooArt is a fun new program for middle schoolers (entering 6th, 7th, or 8th grade) where kids get a chance to learn some creative skills like drawing, painting, and mixed media stuff like collage making. Under the direction of a trained artist, they’ll??????????????????????????????? spend plenty of time learning technique before putting their new skills to work. Visiting several spots around the Zoo and the creek (with sketchbooks provided) the kids learn to draw not only a variety of animals, but plants, flowers and leaves as well. ??????????????????????????????? By the end of the week the kids will have produced three good-quality pieces of art that they can display in class and then take home with them. As ZooArt is a new program, it’s being offered for only two of the weeks during ZooCamp, but judging by the response so far, we might be offering additional sessions in future years.

Also new this year is Conservation Crew, a middle school program that deals with important conservation issues. Here kids learn which conservation efforts Oakland Zoo is currently involved with, as well as what they themselves can do to help. During camp the kids get to participate in various activities (dissecting owl pellets, removing invasive plants and testing water quality at Arroyo Viejo Creek right here in Knowland Park.) During a walk through the Zoo, the kids will stop off at various exhibits where they’ll learn about specific projects relating to those animals such as the Budongo Snare Removal Project in Uganda, 96 Elephants in Africa, and ARCAS, the rain forest wildlife conservation program in Guatemala. Yet rather than overwhelming them with doom and gloom forecasts, Conservation Crew empowers kids by giving them simple suggestions that they can follow to help make a difference in the world.

Every year at ZooCamp we select a particular animal as our conservation theme, along with a related organization to support. This year we’ll be focusing on tigers. One dollar from each camp attendee will go toward PAWS, the Performing Animal Welfare kids in creekSociety here in California. This organization is particularly important to Oakland Zoo because all five of our tigers were rescued from harmful situations. The message we’re trying to impart is that kids themselves can help make important changes in the way animals are treated (for instance by boycotting circuses and movies that employ wild or exotic animals for entertainment.) On the first day of ZooCamp, the kids will learn all about PAWS. They’ll also see a skit put on by the camp teachers where they’ll learn what life is like for a tiger as a pet, as a performing animal, and as a resident of a sanctuary (where tigers actually get to be tigers) and then they’ll see a short presentation. At the end of the week the kids get a special gift bracelet which they earn by demonstrating their commitment to conservation.

So this year should be a very special one at ZooCamp. If you haven’t already signed your kids up for this summer, you can register at http://www.oaklandzoo.org/ZooCamp_Summer.php and get on board while there’s still time. For any additional questions you can call our ZooCamp hotline at (510) 632-9525 ex 280. We’ll see you at ZooCamp!

Big Life, Big Victories! Celebrating Elephants Gala 2015

by | May 13th, 2015
Check out our lovely silent auction on May 16th. Help us protect the elephants that live in Amboseli National Park.

Check out our lovely silent auction on May 16th. Help us protect the elephants that live in Amboseli National Park.

There has been so much going on with elephants this year we can hardly keep up! Did you know that last fall Oakland Zoo aided in the banning of the bullhook in our own city? Yep, that’s right by 2016 the traveling shows with elephants will no longer be able to visit Oakland. Los Angeles has already been successful with a bullhook ban as well. Did you know that last month Ringling Brothers announced that by 2018 they will discontinue the use of elephants in their show? Due to the continuing pressure on the circus not being welcomed in cities across the country because of the treatment of their animals, they gave up the fight against advocates trying to create legislation to stop them. Did you know that this week the city of San Francisco banned the use of performing exotic animals for entertainment in the city? There’s a movement happening, a culture shift, and Oakland Zoo is proud to be a part of the change they have been advocating for, for the last thirty years. Still in the works are Senate Bill 716, a California state bill that will prohibit the use of the bullhook (including the use of a similar tool like a pitchfork), on or even around elephants. Also we are actively working on Assembly Bill 96, a California state bill that will end the legal sales of ivory in California. Yes, ivory is still legal to sell in the state. Just walk down the streets in San Francisco Chinatown and you’ll see it in shop windows. See my previous blog for more info on the issue.

Oakland Zoo is part of both coalitions who are working toward SB 716 and AB 96, collaborating with

Fund-a-need: A fantastic contribution you can make at our silent auction is to give funds toward equipment and supplies for the team that protects the elephants in Amboseli.

Fund-a-need: A fantastic contribution you can make at our silent auction is to give funds toward equipment and supplies for the team that protects the elephants in Amboseli.

some fantastic organizations who all seek the same outcome: the safety and survival of elephants. While we have been advocating for the past thirty years for the management and training style called Protected Contact Positive Reinforcement (PCP+), we also take responsibility that our mission is conservation and education. This year we have dedicated our 19th annual Celebrating Elephants events to fight for the passage of AB 96. We very much welcome Big Life Foundation as a new partner and a 2014 Quarters for Conservation vote. Did you know that when you enter the zoo, twenty five cents of your admission goes directly toward conservation, and you get a token to vote on one of three projects it will go toward? That’s pretty cool!

Amy Baird, Associate Director of Big Life Foundation will be our guest speaker for our 19th annual Celebrating Elephants Gala, on May 16th.

Amy Baird, Associate Director of Big Life Foundation will be our guest speaker for our 19th annual Celebrating Elephants Gala, on May 16th.

Big Life, founded by wildlife photographer Nick Brandt, and conservationist Richard Bonham, focuses on anti-poaching efforts and protects two million acres of land in the Tsavo-Amboseli ecosystem. Big Life is the only organization in East Africa that has coordinated anti-poaching rangers operating on both sides of the Kenya-Tanzania border. To date they have arrested 1790 poachers, and seized 3,012 poaching tools and weapons, while employing 315 rangers with 31 outposts and 15 vehicles.  They recognize that sustainable conservation can only be reached through a community based collaborative approach. Their vision is to establish a successful holistic conservation model in Amboseli-Tsavo that can be replicated across the African continent. They not only protect the elephants that live on this land, but all wildlife. We are lucky enough to have Amy Baird, Associate Director of Big Life to be our guest speaker at the Celebrating Elephants Gala on May 16th.

Please join us for a special Big Life presentation, followed by a reception with spirits and appetizers, and

peruse the lovely silent auction. Doors open at 6:00 pm. Tickets are available at the door or in advance

A forty plus years research study and conservation organization, on the behavior and ecology of African Elephants.

A forty plus years research study and conservation organization, on the behavior and ecology of African Elephants.

at: celebratingelephants2015.brownpapertickets.com. You may also make donations through this site if you can’t make it to the auction. And don’t forget to grab the entire family and join us for the day event on May 23rd, where you will experience the once-a-year opportunity to tour the elephant barn and talk to the staff about how the elephants are taken care of. For more detailed information check it out here:http://www.oaklandzoo.org/Celebrating_Elephants.php.  All proceeds of the two events go to the Amboseli Trust for Elephants in Kenya, check out their website here: https://www.elephanttrust.org/.