Archive for the ‘Events’ Category

Marching for Elephants . . . Join Us!

by | September 27th, 2013
M'Dundamella, 45 years old, with long beautiful tusks. Will her wild-counterparts survive if they keep being poached for their tusks?

M’Dundamella, 45 years old, with long beautiful tusks. Will her wild-counterparts survive if they keep being poached for their tusks?

If you haven’t seen a flyer around town, or a kind face at a table in front of the elephant exhibit at Oakland Zoo to spread the word, I am here to tell you about a very important event that is coming soon. The International Elephant March, created by the iWorry campaign at the Daphne Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, is going to be held on October 4th worldwide! The Daphne Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, or DSWT, is a non-profit who takes in all of the orphaned elephants that lose their mothers and families to the devastating poaching that is currently taking place. There are over one dozen official DSWT sponsored cities that are taking place in the march, and because there are so many people that care, there are now an additional twenty cities worldwide that are hosting a march as well, including San Francisco. Ivory poaching is nothing new, in fact in 1979 there were still 1.3 million African Elephants living, but by 1989 well over half of that population was wiped out due to a demand for their ivory, or tusks, which left a remaining 600,000. In that same year, a ban on selling ivory in Africa was created, which significantly helped to halt the trade. Elephants were left to be in peace . . . mostly. What remained were stockpiles of tusks in many countries in Africa, and with the unfortunate decision to allow a few countries to conduct a one-off sale of these stockpiles, opened up the floodgates.

In China, a sign of wealth is to own ivory, and due to a growing middle class, there is a high demand.

A photo of an ivory and rhino horn confiscation in Hong Kong in August 2013. Ivory is now worth 1,000 dollars per pound.

A photo of an ivory and rhino horn confiscation in Hong Kong in August 2013. Ivory is now worth 1,000 dollars per pound.

With gangs of poachers who are getting more and more sophisticated with their artillery, corrupt African governments, and the high demand from China,  elephants don’t stand a chance . . . unless we come together and make a change. Slowly, the issue is receiving more press and getting attention from politicians and movie stars. Prince William, David Beckham, Yao Ming, and Leonardo DiCaprio are just a few. The Clinton Foundation are strong supporters of the issue, and President Obama recently has put aside a task force, along with a ten million dollar fund to help stop wildlife trafficking. These are steps, but we need MORE! The more awareness we can create the better, especially amongst youth. When tabling at the zoo, I found that there are a lot of people who think that elephant tusks are just cut off without any harm and that they grow back or that they just fall out like our teeth. This is a huge misconception and according to a study by the International Animal Welfare Foundation that was conducted in China, 70% of Chinese people did not realize that ivory comes from dead elephants. If we can create awareness through social media and campaigning we may have a chance at turning things around for elephants. If we stop the demand, we stop elephants lives from being taken. Currently there are an estimated 400,000 African Elephants left, and conservationists are predicting if we continue at 30,000 plus being killed every year then the species will be extinct in another ten years.

A group of very dedicated and passionate local citizens have joined together to create the San Francisco Elephant March. These people have worked day in and day out, campaigning, writing letters, signing petitions, educating, posting flyers, tabling, and some right here at the zoo! I would like to invite you to join us at the March For Elephants in San Francisco on October 4th at 11am. We will be gathering in Portsmouth Square, marching a peaceful protest, and ending in Union Square to listen to keynote speakers Patrick Freeman, Elephant Field Biologist, Patricia Simms, creator of World Elephant Day, and our neighbor and friend Mr. Ed Stewart, co-founder of Performing Animal Welfare Society. Please visit www.marchforelephantsSF.org for more detailed information. You can register for the march, purchase a t-shirt, and check out the map of the march. Please, I encourage everyone to attend this special event and spread the word about what’s going on with elephants.

Please Join us for the March in San Francisco!

Please Join us for the March in San Francisco!

Ask yourself this, can you imagine a world with no elephants?

Hope for Chimpanzees in the Budongo Forest

by | September 12th, 2013

The Budongo Forest in Uganda teems with a wild variety of living beings, from trees to birds to butterflies to primates. Being there is like being in a jungle dream, where the­­­­­­­­­ musical sounds of the forest seem beyond imagination. One of the best things about being the Conservation Director at Oakland Zoo, is the occasional privilege of visiting such places on our planet.

Along with this privilege comes the knowledge gained around the challenges of sharing our planet. Deep within this lush forest habitat of blue monkeys, chimpanzees, baboons and hornbills- are people, who also need shelter, space and food.

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Amy Gotliffe (far left)

Some people living near the Budongo Forest seek their protein from bushmeat, illegally snaring a pig or deer. The snares, made from a thin wire, are nearly invisible against the foliage, and as chimpanzees walk through the corridors, their hands or feet can become trapped in the snares. In two of the forests where chimpanzees are studied, researchers have observed up to 30 percent of chimpanzees are maimed due to snare injuries. More die.

Researchers in the forest name the chimps that they observe: Flora is missing their right hands at the wrist. Kigare, his right foot. Zig’s right hand is badly deformed by snares. Kigere’s name literally means ‘missing foot’ in Kinyoro and refers to an old snare injury which removed her foot at the ankle.

Human-wildlife conflict is an issue here, and all over the world, from chimpanzees and humans in Uganda to mountain lions and humans here in our own habitat in California. The challenges that many species face can feel overwhelming.

Now for the best part of my job: hope. The Budongo Snare Removal Project gives me great hope that compassion and creativity can still reign in the human heart and mind. This project sends teams of two men (anti-snare teams) to locate and remove snares and mark the spot with a GPS devise. An education center reaches out to the local community and provides education around ecology, wildlife and the treasure that is the chimpanzees. A nanny goat program rounds out the project, offering ex-poachers an opportunity to raise milk, meat and money for their families in exchange for a promise to cease the use of snares.

When our Oakland Zoo team of intrepid travelers last visited the project in 2011, we got to experience hope the size of Africa herself. Speaking to an anti-snare team, I learn that Ofen now owns land for his family, as well as 20 goats, and Moses feels he has more knowledge of the forest and sees this work is a source of survival. We spent an exuberant day helping the veterinarian team de-worm over 100 goats that are now owned by sworn anti-poachers, and best of all, we saw chimpanzees. They hooted and called as they searched for fruit and built nests above us for sleeping. Despite some of their injuries, they lived in a forest where people are trying to live in balance with wildlife. They lived in a forest where people, trees, chimps and hope are alive and thriving. Please watch our short video about our chimpanzees at the Zoo and our conservation work in Budongo.

The Oakland Zoo adopted this project in 2001 and the support covers the salaries for four field assistants, two educators, two eco-guards, the nanny goat program and allowances for transportation, bike repair, gum boots, rain gear, backpacks, and compasses. The zoo is the only supporter of this project. We are proud of its compassion and respect for animals, people and the entire ecosystem.

Funds raised at an annual fall lecture and silent auction go toward this project. This year’s event will feature author Virginia Morell on September 26th

A Wild Night at the Movies

by | September 6th, 2013

zoovienights_bannerSky-high ticket prices, over-priced snacks, difficult parking and noisy customers—no wonder people often stay home from the movie theater these days. But who says going to the movies can’t still be fun? Now, you can bring the family to Oakland Zoo for a reasonably-priced evening of movies, snacks, and old-fashioned family fun.

Presenting Zoovie Nights, the new family-themed entertainment events at Oakland Zoo!

From 6:30 – 9:30 on select Friday and Saturday nights throughout the year, the Zoo is hosting nature and conservation-themed movies for families with kids 4-11 years old. So get the family car ready. But don’t worry about dressing up. Our guests are encouraged to come in their PJs and bring comfy blankets and pillows—whatever you need to feel at home here at the Zoo. We’ll provide the snacks (hot chocolate and fresh-popped popcorn, but you can also bring your own favorites.) Roosevelt the alligator (Oakland Zoo’s mascot) will be there in his own PJs to greet you and will be available so you can have your photos taken with him.

We’ll gather in the Marian Zimmer Auditorium located at our lower entrance, where you’ll also get the chance to meet a few of our small animals up close before the movie starts. Once you get settled in with your pillows, popcorn and drinks, it’s showtime!

Here’s the schedule we’ve got for you so far:

9/20 Antz
9/28 Mr. Poppers Penguins
10/11 Charlotte’s Web
11/15 Madagascar
12/20 Fantastic Mr. Fox
1/17 Horton Hears a Who
2/15 Madagascar 2
3/21 Rio
4/26 Fern Gully
5/30 Madagascar 3
6/28 Ice Age
8/30 Rango

Sounds like a pretty cool line-up, doesn’t it? There’s something for everybody. So if you and your family want a movie-going experience that you’ll never forget, come check out Zoovie Nights at Oakland Zoo. For program fees and other information, please see the link above or call our Education Reservations Associate at (510) 632-9525 ext. 220. We’ll see you at the movies… I mean Zoovies!

Supporting Elephants . . . Worldwide!

by | August 9th, 2013

WEDLOGODid you know that this Monday, August 12th is the second annual World Elephant Day? Here at Oakland Zoo we have been officially celebrating elephants for seventeen years with our annual ‘Celebrating Elephants Day’. This event gives the zoo the opportunity to increase awareness about elephant issues both in captivity and the wild, as well as raise money for the Amboseli Trust for Elephants. On a larger scale, increasing elephant issue awareness is exactly what World Elephant Day is intended to do, and elephants need your help more than ever. World Elephant Day is supported by the Elephant Reintroduction Foundation, located in Bangkok, Thailand. The day’s mission is “ to help conserve and protect elephants from the numerous threats they face; poaching, habitat loss, human-elephant conflict, and mistreatment in captivity.” The Foundation asks us to “experience elephants in non-exploitive and sustainable environments where elephants can thrive under care and protection.”

African Elephants are under increasing threat of extinction in ten years if we don’t act now and stop the ivory trade. In 1979 there were 1.3 million African elephants, now less than 400,000 remain, due to increasing greed of Asian markets. 35,000 were killed last year alone! The endangered Asian Elephant has been suffering from severe habitat loss and fragmented migration routes due to highways and industrial mono-crops (like palm oil). Less than 40,000 remain today.

elephantinpool

Our Osh, taking a bath in his pool

Captivity paints a much different picture. Asian elephants have been captured for centuries, being forced by their handlers to beg in the streets, give ride after ride to tourists, and be used as laborers to help haul logs to clear forests. Don’t let anyone fool you; Asian elephants are not domesticated animals! You’ll also see lots of Asian elephants in circuses, as well as some African elephants, being forced to perform painful tricks, and wear silly, degrading costumes for entertainment. An elephant wearing a tutu is not cute, nor does it create a connection with the general public. It is insulting to this majestic, magnificent, and intelligent species.  By the way, the circus is in town, so please, if you respect elephants as well as other species, do NOT attend the circus.

Hopefully by now, you’re asking what you can do to help!!

There are ways everyone can help, so please help TAKE ACTION! Here are just a few things to get you started:

Study elephants in their “keystone” role in the environment and inter-relationships with plants and animals from which it originates.

Support organizations that are working to protect elephants both in the wild and captivity . . . Amboseli Trust for Elephants, Save the Elephants, Performing Animal Welfare Society (PAWS), The Elephant Sanctuary in Tennessee . . . are just a few.

Do not support organizations that exploit or abuse elephants for entertainment and profit, such as the circus and the movie industry.

Do not ride an elephant . . . whether at the circus, at a park, or in another country. Elephants are not domesticated and were not meant to be ridden, they are wild animals. Saving these species, does not mean riding them. Watching them in their natural habitat participating in natural behaviors in the wild, such as a nice zoo, or PAWS, is being able to truly respect and appreciate them.

Sign online petitions that you come across that will help support elephant causes.

Be an elephant-aware consumer. Do not buy ivory products. Do not buy coffee that is not shade-grown or fair-trade, or products which contain palm oil.

Talk to a neighbor . . . all it takes is one conversation to possibly change someone’s mind if they are unaware of what is going on regarding the plight elephants.

Spread the word by blogging, and sharing links on Facebook and twitter.

Oakland Zoo is proud to be a part of this documentary that showcases the plight of elephants.

Oakland Zoo is proud to be a part of this documentary that showcases the plight of elephants.

Pick one of these actions above and help us TAKE ACTION on World Elephant Day. Try choosing a new action item each week and partake in the battle for

elephants worldwide!

Please join the March for Elephants taking place in San Francisco, on October 4, 2013 from 11am to 2pm beginning in Portsmouth Square. 25 cities worldwide will be participating in this march, all on October 4, to help take a stand for elephants and say NO to ivory. Please visit www.marchforelephantssf.org for more information on the upcoming march, how to be involved, and how you can help.

A Bear of a Party

by | August 5th, 2013

 

TeddyBearTea296x172Sometimes the best kinds of animals are stuffed. No, I don’t mean the ones you find in a museum. I mean the cuddly plush ones like your favorite childhood teddy bear. After all, they provide comfort and security, and bring magic and imagination into our lives, even as adults. So after all they do for us, why not treat them to their own party. That’s exactly what you and your child (along with their favorite stuffed animal) can do at Oakland Zoo at the new Teddy Bear Tea Parties.

 

We’ve been hearing suggestions from parents who want more programs at the Zoo that they can participate in with their children (as opposed to our drop-off programs which are geared for kids alone.) So we came up with a very cute program indeed. Held once a month on Saturday mornings, Teddy Bear Tea offers an entertaining and informative activity for 4 to 8 year olds and their parents. But it’s much more than just a tea party. First, we gather in one of our classrooms, where you’ll hear a bear-themed story and learn how to be a bear in the wild. You’ll enjoy tea, coffee, juice and other snacks such as scones, cookies and assorted fruit. After that, you and your child will have the chance to make fun enrichment items for the Zoo’s sun bears, using cardboard boxes and colorful art materials. These decorated boxes will be filled with various yummy treats for the bears to snack on.

Exploring a Fun Box

Exploring a Fun Box

Afterwards, you’ll head up to the sun bear observation deck and watch as the bears eagerly discover and tear open the boxes that you just made for them. And as you meet one of our bear keepers, you’ll get answers to all those bear questions that you’ve been dying to ask. Enrichment is a big part of the animals’ lives here at Oakland Zoo, and our bears get excited whenever they find fun new things in their exhibit to sniff and eat.
Speaking of fun things to eat, when you attend the Teddy Bear Tea, you’ll get to snack on the same type of 5-fruit salad that our bears

enjoy eating every day. You’ll also receive a gift bag full of assorted animal themed goodies as well as a special personalized thank you letter with photo addressed to your child and their stuffed animal, signed by one of our sun bears.
So if you’re looking for something fun to do with your 4 to 8 year old, sign up for one of Oakland Zoo’s new Teddy Bear Tea parties. The next parties are scheduled for August 17, September 14, and October 12. Parties run from 9:30 am until noon. Don’t forget to invite your child’s favorite teddy or other stuffed animal.

See You at the Next Teddy Bear Tea Party

Awaiting the Next Teddy Bear Tea

For further information, additional tea party dates and to make a reservation, contact our Education Department at (510) 632-9525 ext 220, or email educationreservations@oaklandzoo.org. See you at the party!

 

 

It’s Feeding Time at Oakland Zoo

by | July 9th, 2013

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zena the zookeeper

Over 660 animals reside in Oakland Zoo (one hundred and sixty species), each requiring a different meal:

  •  Large cats such as lions and tigers, along with vultures, eat different types of meat
    – pork neck bones, ground meat, chicken, and more.
  •  Fruit bats eat fruits like cantaloupes, apples, and pears.
  •  Chimpanzees and sun bears eat different types of fruits and vegetables. Sun bears will also eat small amounts of  insects and meat.
  •  Giraffes eat edible tree parts (browse), different types of   grass hays, and small amounts of chopped vegetables.
  • Warthogs eat different types of vegetables, small amounts of fruit, and small types of grass hays.
  • Carnivores (meat eaters) consume dead rabbits, guinea pigs, deer, pig feet and skulls, and horse meat.
  • Herbivores (plant eaters) have a sweet tooth. This allows the keepers to insert medications in their meals such as hiding pills in Fig Newtons.
  • Food is donated or purchased, from different vendors such as “U.S. Foods,” “Concord Feed,” “North Bay Meat,” and other vendors. For some of the animals, keepers use branches and leaves found on Zoo grounds.

Do you want to feed our animals? You can at our upcoming Feast for the Beasts event – bring in fruits and vegetables and watch as our elephants and other animals enjoy your treats. Find out more here.