Archive for the ‘Family Fun’ Category

It’s “Celebrating Elephants” time at Oakland Zoo!

by | April 30th, 2014

zena-the-zookeeperDid you know that Oakland Zoo is the only zoo in Northern California with African Elephants?  We have FOUR amazing African Elephants, three females and one male, and if you know the Oakland Zoo, you know that elephant conservation is VERY important to us! Elephants in the wild are in trouble, and they have been for a very long time. Why? Because they are hunted for their beautiful ivory tusks. Trinkets, jewelry and other stuff is carved from their ivory. Hunting elephants is against the law, but sadly it still happens.

All elephants are individuals and have very unique personalities. This is M'Dundamella, 45 years old with long beautiful tusks.

All elephants are individuals and have very unique personalities. This is M’Dundamella, 45 years old with long beautiful tusks.

Not too long ago, we at the Zoo decided to get even more involved in saving wild elephants than we already are by joining a campaign called “96 Elephants”. 96 is how many elephants are killed in the wild every day for their ivory. But there is good news! There are new laws here in the United States to stop the importing of ivory! Lots if Zoos are banding together to help stop the ivory trade altogether, and you can help too!

Every year, we at the Zoo have a very special event called “Celebrating Elephants”. On May 17th, we have a fun-filled day where you can enjoy and learn about elephants, while helping to save elephants in the wild. The Zoo is home to four African elephants named Donna, Lisa, M’Dunda and Osh, you can read more about them below. On the 17th, you can see them up close by buying a ticket for a special private elephant barn tour! We will also be selling raffle tickets for great prizes and all the money raised will go to helping elephants in the wild through our conservation partner, the Amboseli Trust for Elephants in Africa.

Osh, our only boy, is 20 and has been with us since 2004. He came from Howletts Wild Animal Park, where he was born with his family group. Young males in the wild get kicked out of their herd from ages 8-12, and that is what Osh’s mom and aunts started to do to him, so we gave him a home here at Oakland Zoo. Osh is extremely active, exploratory, and curious. He’s got a very lively and chipper walk, and he loves to play, browse and graze.

Donna is 35 years old and came to Oakland Zoo in 1989. She very quickly became the dominant female because she had the biggest attitude. She is the most playful out of the girls.  At nighttime you will find her having fun playing with the large tractor tires in her enclosure and charging into the pool for a cool-down! Personality-wise Donna is impatient, loves to participate in training, and is closely bonded with Lisa, whom she sleeps with every night. See how and why we train our elephants here!

Lisa is 37 years old and has been with us since she was two years old. She came from Kruger National Park in South Africa and went briefly to a “training” facility for several months then came to the zoo. Lisa is an ‘elephant’s elephant,’ she likes all of her pachyderm friends, and wants to make everyone happy. She loves her pool. We call her our water baby, because she will take daily dips if the weather is right! Want to see Lisa taking a bath? She is sneaky, agile, and can be very stubborn!

M’Dunda is 45 years old and came to us in 1991. She has a bad history of abuse at her previous facility; which is amazing because she is an extremely gentle soul and wouldn’t hurt a fly. She loves to play with Osh, and is often spotted at night leaning over the fence into Osh’s area, trunk-twirling with him. She can be a little insecure, and scared of new situations. When she first came here she wouldn’t eat her treat boxes! She sure does now, though! She also has long beautiful tusks.

So come to “Celebrating Elephants” on May 17th and see our elephants up close, learn about elephants in the wild, and just have a great  ol’ time!

 

Earth Day Outreach and Elephant Advocacy

by | April 25th, 2014

Last Saturday, April 19th, Oakland Zoo celebrated Earth Day with over fifty conservation organization stations and over 5,000 zoo guests to educate! Up at the elephant enclosure we were engaging our visitors to take action for elephants! They had three options:

  1. Cheryl Matthews, elephant barn volunteer, encouraging kids to draw elephant pictures for the 96 Elephants campaign.

    Cheryl Matthews, elephant barn volunteer, encouraging kids to draw elephant pictures for the 96 Elephants campaign.

    1. Sign a petition. In support of our new partner 96 Elephants (www.96elephants.org) we received over 100 signatures for a petition to say no to the ivory trade and to support all government efforts in the United States to declare a ban on the trade.

  2. 2. Color an elephant picture. As part of 96 Elephants Kids Save Elephants campaign, children were encouraged to color a picture of an elephant, and turn it in to zoo staff. Our goal is to gather up 960 drawings to turn into our state governor. Since 96 Elephants has over 100 partners, their overall goal is to have 96,000 drawings total to turn into state governors. This was a huge hit with the kids, and we acquired over 120 drawings, well on our way to 960!

3. Buy a ticket for the Celebrating Elephants drawing. Our Celebrating Elephants events, on May 17th and 24th are coming up soon (www.oaklandzoo.org/Events.php). Guests had the opportunity to buy a ticket to win the following prizes: An up-close visit with our elephants to see how we care for them through

Kids advocating for elephants at Oakland Zoo Earth Day!
Kids advocating for elephants at Oakland Zoo Earth Day!

 

Protected Contact, Giants tickets, Walk in the Wild tickets, Oakland Zoo Zoomobile visit, and Zoo Lights family tickets. All proceeds of this event and from the drawing go to the Amboseli Trust for Elephants in Kenya to support the 40 year research project which directly protects the elephants that live in the park.

Talking to kids and adults about what’s going on with the ivory trade got me really excited for our 18th annual Celebrating Elephants Day, a day of advocacy for captive and wild elephants here at Oakland Zoo. Engaging the public whether it’s to sign a petition, or donate their time or money, is so important because it means they are a part of the change that is to come and it means that they care. Every dollar, every minute, and every thought spent on elephants counts in the fight to save them, whether from the circus or the ivory trade.

Celebrating Elephants Evening Saturday, May 17th: Join us for a lovely evening of light appetizers and beverages and peruse an array of silent auction items donated from local bay area restaurants, breweries, shops, and artists. Auction items feature gift certificates, local winery gift baskets, sports events tickets, hand-crafted art, and behind the scenes visits to California Academy of Sciences, CuriOdessey, Safari West, and Oakland Zoo! The highlight of the evening will be speaker Vicki Fishlock, Resident Scientist at Amboseli Trust for Elephants. Dr. Fishlock joined the research team in 2011 to study the social resilience of female elephants following a devastating drought in 2009. She will share some of her findings in her ongoing research looking at the fascinating social dynamics in the lives of female elephants, and how these individual relationships shape the success of families. Come hear stories of success and struggle of the magnificent elephants of the Amboseli Plains. Watch a sneak peak of Vicki here on YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zWsuXbUJNpI). This year’s Celebrating Elephants will be in honor of 96 Elephants. We will feature their petition to sign, information about the campaign, and a small presentation before the lecture about our involvement.

Celebrating Elephants Day, Saturday May 24th: Join us for a day of adventure and fun, while being educated about the perils of the ivory trade and cruelty of elephants in circuses. Highlights of the day include: elephant barn tours to see Osh elephant get his daily pedicure while keepers explain the importance of protected contact and training, Circus-Finelli, an animal-free circus, an elephant treat box making station, face painting, and a chance to learn how to observe and identify elephants in the wild!

Just like you helped us make Earth Day special come and join us for Celebrating Elephants and be an elephant advocate. Sign petitions, draw an elephant, and buy a drawing ticket all in the fight to save the earth’s most majestic creature. Remember everything you do, no matter how small helps, even if it’s encouraging a friend to attend!

Celebrating Elephants in 2014: A Sneak Peak

by | April 18th, 2014
All elephants are individuals and have very unique personalities. This is M'Dundamella, 45 years old with long beautiful tusks.

All elephants are individuals and have very unique personalities. This is M’Dundamella, 45 years old with long beautiful tusks.

Did you know that the elephant heart weighs 40-60 pounds and beats 30 times a minute? Did you know that the brain weighs 11 pounds and has a highly complex neocortex, a trait also shared by humans, apes, and dolphins? Did you realize that elephants exhibit a wide array of emotions and behaviors such as grief, learning, allomothering, mimicry, play, altruism, tool-use, compassion, cooperation, and self-awareness? These are just a few important facts about why we should care about elephants and why we need to fight for their survival. Advocacy, education, and conservation are key concepts to protecting elephants and this is what Oakland Zoo is all about!!

We would like to invite you to our 18th annual Celebrating Elephants events, on May 17th and 24th. All of the proceeds of these two days go directly to the Amboseli Trust for Elephants in Kenya, to protect the elephant herds in Amboseli National Park. ATE’s forty year research project, founded by world-renowned researcher Cynthia Moss, has made many important contributions to elephant research and the knowledge gained has profoundly altered the way we think about, conserve, and manage elephant populations. Their research has highlighted the ethical implications of dealing with sentient, long-lived, intelligent, and socially complex animals and their knowledge base provides powerful and authoritative support to elephant conservation and advocacy campaigns worldwide.

A sneak peak into the Amboseli elephants . . .

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The AA family drinking. The first identified herd of the Amboseli Elephant Research Project in 1972.

Besides tail hair length, tusk length, and size (all changing characteristics) elephants are typically identified by the notches, holes, rips, and tears in their ears, most of which are caused by walking through thorny brush. At Amboseli, elephants are identified by these ear notches and named and categorized by the alphabet, most often, unless a truly unique characteristic defines them. Therefore, the first family Cynthia Moss studied were known as the AA’s on September 1st, 1972, the very first day of the study. From that day, over forty years of observations and data has been collected on them and many other herds. Elephants are extremely social and live in fission-fusion matriarchal societies, constantly joining together and breaking apart depending on environmental conditions and available resources. Sometimes, when conditions are optimal elephants will form what is known as an aggregation and come together to socialize, play, touch, rest, drink, mud, dust, and eat. These aggregations typically average 300-400 individuals, but Cynthia has counted as many as 550 at one time! Read up about more Amboseli elephants here, http://www.elephanttrust.org/.

 

Vicki Fishlock, Resident Scientist at Amboseli, will speak about her studies at our evening event and silent auction on May 17th.

To learn more about these magnificent, majestic beings join us Saturday evening on May 17th, for a special presentation by Dr. Vicki Fishlock, Resident Scientist for the Amboseli Trust for Elephants. Dr. Fishlock joined the research team in 2011 to study the social resilience of female elephants following a devastating drought in 2009. She will share some of her findings in her ongoing research looking at the fascinating social dynamics in the lives of female elephants, and how these individual relationships shape the success of families. She will explain how age, experience, and leadership influence the survival of calves and families in the sometimes difficult life of an elephant. Come hear stories of success and struggle of the magnificent elephants of the Amboseli Plains. The lecture will be followed by a wonderful reception including drink and appetizers, amongst a lovely silent auction, so get ready to bid! Here’s a link to more details about the event http://www.oaklandzoo.org/Calendar_Item.php?i=800.

 

 

Join us the following Saturday, May 24th, for a day of fun and celebrating how special elephants are!

Keeper Gina working with African elephant

Keeper Gina working with African elephant

Family friendly activities will include exciting elephant stations such as touching gigantic elephant bones, making treat boxes for the elephants to eat, holding an eleven pound tooth, and stepping into an elephant-sized footprint. Grab binoculars and participate in a mock research camp where observers are invited to watch and record behaviors, and they can learn how to identify our elephants! Also watch the amazingly talented Circus Finelli, an animal free circus. And don’t forget to experience the once-a-year opportunity behind the scenes to see where the elephants sleep, watch an elephant pedicure, and see how the zookeepers train with them to conduct their husbandry care. This day is also an important opportunity for the staff to explain the differences of elephant management and why you shouldn’t go to or support the circus.

This year Celebrating Elephants will be in honor of Wildlife Conservation Society’s 96 Elephants campaign, named for the 96 elephants that are poached in Africa every day for their tusks.  In December of 2013 Oakland Zoo officially teamed up with the campaign to take action in helping fight the illegal ivory trade through public awareness and taking action through California legislation to change policy against selling and trading ivory.

Read my blog (http://www.oaklandzoo.org/blog/author/ggambertoglio/) or go to our website to find out more details on the campaign and how you can help!

Welcome Oakland Zoo's new partnership with the Wildlife Conservation Society's 96 Elephants Campaign to raise awareness.

Welcome Oakland Zoo’s new partnership with the Wildlife Conservation Society’s 96 Elephants Campaign to raise awareness.

 

Help Send a Kid to Camp This Summer

by | April 7th, 2014

Have you ever wanted to make a real difference in a child’s life? Sometimes, it’s as easy as helping them have a great summer. And how do you do that? Here’s an idea that you may not have considered before: Zoo Camp scholarships.animal closeup - hedgehog2
As you might already know, for the past thirty years Oakland Zoo has been organizing an immensely popular summer camp program. Each summer, Bay Area kids ages 4 through 18 are able to take a weeklong break from their everyday lives, joining hundreds of other kids for a special outdoor experience of fun, learning, and friendship. With songs, games, crafts, and nature/animal-themed activities, Oakland Zoo Camp offers the kind of genuine, hands-on experiences that are becoming harder to find in today’s techno-centric world.
But not everyone who wants to attend Zoo Camp is able to do so. Although our camp fees are very reasonable, many local kids come from families of lower income levels that aren’t easily able to afford programs of this kind. To remedy this, Oakland Zoo makes it possible every year for a certain number of children to attend its Summer Zoo Camp at a significant discount (up to 80% of the registration fee for one week of camp per child.) But the money to make these scholarships possible doesn’t just grow on trees. The program depends on outside funding.
To facilitate this, the Zoo actively solicits donations from family foundations, such as the Lowell Barry Foundation, which has awarded generous grants to the program over the years. Individual donors have also contributed, including Oakland Zoo staff members, who often donate the employee discounted portion of their child’s camp registration fee back to the program. And other parents of zoo campers occasionally donate extra money to help fund these scholarships as well.
In 2009, the program got a big boost when Oakland Zoo docent Lin Kay and husband Tony gave a generous donation to the Zoo Camp scholarship fund, and named it in honor of a close family member. Since then, they’ve donated to the Vickie Kay Memorial Zoo Camp Scholarship Fund every year. Last year, with an available balance of $7200, Oakland Zoo awarded 33 scholarships for its Summer Zoo Camp program, allowing dozens of financially strapped families to send their child to camp.
I recently talked with Zoo Camp Director Sarah Cramer who said, “We’d love to be able to accommodate all requests for scholarships, but unfortunately these requests always exceed the available funds.” (In fact, the money usually runs out within the first three weeks of camp registration.) The scholarships are need-based, so a selection process is necessary whereby applicants are assessed by family income levels. Despite our numerous funding sources, many of the families that would’ve been able to qualify are being turned away. That’s where you can help.
By making a donation, you can ensure that one more child gets the chance to be a part of this wonderful experience. Simply give Matt Rasmussen in our Development Department a call at (510) 632-9525 x154. For other questions regarding Zoo Camp please call Sarah Cramer at (510) 632-9525 x123. You can feel good, knowing that your gift will make a real difference in a child’s summer!

 

The REAL Lemurs of Oakland Zoo!

by | April 3rd, 2014
Jennifer

Ring Tailed Lemur at Oakland Zoo

“Look!  King Julian!”

“I like to move it, move it! I like to move it, move it!”

These are just a few phrases I often hear when I’m working in the lemur exhibit here at Oakland Zoo.  While movies such as “Madagascar” and “The Lion King” may foster an interest of wild animals in their young audience, they don’t provide any actual knowledge of the animals starring in them.

And that’s where I get to perform one of the cool parts of my job as a keeper- to interact with our guests and provide actual facts about these amazing beings!

First I get to tell them there would not be a King Julian in lemur society!  There would be a Queen Julianne instead.  Just like several other awesome species such as elephants, meerkats and hyenas, lemurs are matriarchal, which means the ladies are in charge! And in our troop of ring-tailed lemurs, Amy is the boss!

While observing our lemurs look for the lemur that is always paying attention to everyone else, whose tail is always pointing straight up or forward and who is always first at meal time- that’s Amy. She will be the one who decides where to forage, when to sit in the sun and when to groom.  Her twin daughters Kristina and Jennifer along with their buddy Jaeger defer to her decisions about their daily life.  If not, she may deliver a stern look or possibly chase the misbehaving individual if necessary.  Notice the body posture of the other lemurs.  Because Amy is always on duty, they can be a little more relaxed, with their tails curled over their backs in a question mark as they forage, groom or sun themselves.

Next, I tell our guests lemurs DO like to move it!  But our lemurs don’t move it just for the fun of it- they move to live!  Wild animals have jobs to do.  Their job is to protect their territory, find food and a safe place to live and raise their young.  In the wild this is a full time job.  In captivity, many of these normal behaviors are fulfilled by their keepers- we provide them with a safe place to live, the right diet and social group.  The keeper’s job is to find ways in which the animals in our care can perform these natural behaviors.  We call it “enrichment”.  Enrichment encompasses a wide variety of options and can include;

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Lead Keeper Elizabeth Abram training a Sclater’s or Blue-Eyed Lemur.

Manual manipulation- We may put their diet in a “puzzle feeder” or boxes so they have to use physical and mental skills to get their food.

Changes in their environment – We can move or change the “furniture” in their exhibit to keep their environment complex and stimulating.

Sensory stimulation – straw or bedding from another animal enclosure, or even spices or perfume, can be put into their exhibit to add novel  and unique experiences.

Feeding options- a keeper may scatter an animal’s diet in the grass or skewer items onto branches throughout their exhibit, so the animal will have to forage to find their diet items, allowing the them to feed in a natural manner.

And the list can go on and on! These are just a few of the many ways keepers provide necessary and very important enrichment activities, providing the proper psychological wellbeing for our animals.  I think I can speak for the rest of my coworkers- enrichment is one of the favorite aspects of our jobs!

Next time you are visiting Oakland Zoo, take a moment to check out our lemurs moving it around our exhibit.  Is Queen Amy leading the troop to forage in the plum trees or initiating a mutual grooming session?  Has their keeper given them their diet in a box or scattered it about their exhibit?  If it’s a sunny day you might see them sitting in a “Buddha” like pose- soaking up the springtime sun! No matter what, you’re bound to see real lemurs “moving it” just like real lemurs should!

Do you want to get up close and personal with our lemurs here at the Zoo? Purchase a raffle ticket (or two!) to win such a one-of-a-kind experience! During your visit, our lemurs will actually paint a work of art for you to keep. Email genny@oaklandzoo.org to purchase tickets. All proceeds from the raffle go to conservation of lemurs in the wild.

 

 

Celebrate Earth Day with a Party for the Planet!

by | March 25th, 2014

Imagine you and your family and friends on a beautiful spring day dancing to live music, building with pine cones, learning to juggle,  meeting your next feline or canine family member and having a ball all while helping the planet? This is how Oakland Zoo celebrates Earth Day!Earthday 2007_123

Humans around the globe have been celebrating their connection to and reverence of the planet for centuries. It makes sense that our modern society would create a day such as Earth Day: a special day set aside to appreciate and take action for our one precious planet. Earth Day was first officially celebrated in the United States in 1970, and is now celebrated in nearly 200 countries each year.

Oakland Zoo also feels that the Earth is indeed something to celebrate, and therefore we produce one of the largest Earth Day events in the East Bay.  This year our event is on Saturday, April 19th and we are calling it a Party of the Planet.

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Earth Day fits our mission perfectly: To inspire respect for and stewardship of the natural world while creating a quality visitor experience. What could be more inspiring than making a genuine connection with over fifty visiting organizations who work to help animals and the environment?  Other inspiring experiences will include creating with natural objects in the Create with Nature Zone and making beaded necklaces that help the lives of people and chimpanzees. Quality experiences will be had by all, such as a full day of educational shows in the Clorox Wildlife Theater with live animals, the Jug Bandits Band and Wildlife Action Trivia. Quality fun will be bountiful the meadow with our giant earth ball, circus antics, face painting and a real trapeze show with Trapeze Arts.

Other highlights of Earth Day include: a free train ride with donation of used cell phone or ink cartridge, voting for your favorite conservation project at the Quarters for Conservation voting station, Oakland Zoo docent and eduction stations, and of course, visiting our resident animals.

To further walk the talk, Oakland Zoo will be hosting our monthly Creek Crew clean up of Arroyo Viejo Creek on the grounds from 10:00 AM – 1:00 PM.DSCN1072

We are thrilled to welcome the following organizations to join us this year: 96 Elephants, Africa Matters, All One Ocean, Amazon Watch, Amboseli Trust for Elephants, Animal Rescue Foundation, Aquarium of the Bay, Bay Area Air Quality Management District, Bay Localize, Bay Area Puma Project, Budongo Snare Removal Project, the Borneo Project, California Department of Fish and Wildlife, California Wolf Center, Circus Moves, Cheetah Conservation Fund, Create with Nature Zone, East Bay Co-Housing, East Bay SPCA, Eco-Viva, Go Wild Institute, Handsome in Pink, Kids for the Bay, KQED, Marine Mammal Center, Marshall’s Farm Honey, Mickaboo Companion Bird Rescue, Mickacoo Pigeon and Dove Rescue, Mountain Lion Foundation, Mountain Yellow Legged Frog Project, Northern Light School, Oakland Veg, Pachas Pajamas, Performing Animal Welfare Society, Pesticide Free Zone, Project Coyote, Rainforest Action Network, Red Panda Network, Reticulated Giraffe Project, River Otter Ecology Project, Samasheva, Save the Frogs, Savenature.org, Stopwaste.org, Sulfur Creek Nature Center, San Francisco Seafood Watch Alliance, Uganda Carnivore Program, Trapeze Arts, Ventana Wildlife Society, WildAid and the Western Pond Turtle Project.

You will need a full day to experience all this inspiration and fun! We hope to see you out there on April 19th!