Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

It’s Hibernation Time!

by | December 6th, 2013

zena-the-zookeeperHey Kids! Well, it’s about time for some of our animals here at the Zoo to get ready to go into torpor and hibernate for the winter months. When an animal goes into torpor, its heart rate and breathing slow way down, and it is in a state of deep rest.  Hibernation is a kind of torpor that happens when the weather gets cold.  Some animals go into such deep hibernation that they are very difficult to awaken.  These animals don’t eat or drink while they are hibernating.  Others are light hibernators who are still resting, but they are easy to awaken and may even wake themselves up to eat or go to the bathroom.  It’s kind of like they are taking long naps throughout the winter.  Some other animals go into torpor when the weather gets hot.  That kind of torpor is called estivation, but we’ll talk about that some other time.

I used to think that it had to be really cold and snowy for animals to hibernate, but then I found out that that isn’t true.  Even though it doesn’t get really, really cold here in the Bay Area, some of our animals still hibernate for a time during the winter months.  You may be surprised to find out which of our Zoo and Park animals hibernate. Here are just some of them:

  • Snailscollage
  • Bumble Bees
  • Ground Squirrels
  • Brown Bats
  • Raccoons
  • Hedgehogs
  • Skunks
  • Garter snakes
  • Sonoran Desert Toads
  • Box Turtles
  • Hermann’s Tortoises
  • Desert Tortoises
  • Chuckwallas
  • Gila Monsters
  • Desert Spiny Lizards
  • Alligators

So, were you surprised by any of these hibernators? I sure was!  Did it surprise you that our sun bears were not on the list?  Why do you think that might be?  And what about our lions?  Hmmm…that’s something to think about, isn’t it?

Luckily you can still come and see some of our light-hibernating friends throughout the winter, but once they go into torpor, some of our deep hibernators will be fast asleep and out of sight until Spring rolls around again.

Well, seems like there are lots of reasons to get out to the Zoo and visit us as the holiday fun begins.  Until next time, remember – conservation rocks!

Your friend,

Zena the Zookeeper

Toys needed for Sun Bears in Borneo
(Oakland Zoo Conservation Program)

by | October 21st, 2013
sun bear in basket

A rescued Sunbear at the Bornean sunbear conservation Center gets to relax in her basket.

The Bornean Sun Bear Conservation Centre, located in the Malaysian state of Sabah on the island of Borneo, rescues sun bears and seeks to rehabilitate bears that may be suitable to return to the wild.

 

Most of the 28 bears in residence at the Centre are victims of the illegal pet trade….mother bears are killed by poachers for their body parts (paws, bile from the gall bladder) and orphaned cubs are often captured and spend their lives in small bare cages without adequate space or proper diet. Many of the bears at the Centre have never walked on grass or been able to climb a tree, a tragedy for these very arboreal bears. The Centre currently has one new bear house built in

Enjoying a new ball

Enjoying a new ball

2010 attached to one hectare (2.5 acres) of forest enclosure, and is in the process of adding a second bear house and forest enclosure. A visitor centre, viewing platform and guest walkway connecting visitors with nearby Sepilok Orangutan Rehabilitation Centre, are all due to be completed in early 2014. Please visit the BSBCC website at www.bsbcc.org.my to learn more and find out how you can support the extraordinary work being done to save the world’s smallest bear species”.

 

 

Pagi, one of Oakland Zoo's sunbears enjoying her Kong.

Pagi, one of Oakland Zoo’s sunbears enjoying her Kong.

Through our fundraising efforts, our support of the BSBCC helps to fund completion of the much-needed rehabilitation facility in Sabah. Oakland Zoo’s own veterinarians have travelled to Malaysia to provide hands-on assistance in moving and providing medical care to the Sun Bears currently being rehabilitated by the BSBCC. Now, on October 31st, Oakland Zoo staff is leading a trip to Borneo very soon and they will be visiting the Bornean Sun Bear Conservation Centre. The bears at the center have been rescued as orphans due to poaching and often from the illegal pet trade. In fact, our bear, Ting Ting, was one of those cubs as were both parents of Bulan and Pagi.  The staff at the center would love to be able to provide their bears with “Kong” toys such as Pagi is enjoying. Here at Oakland Zoo, Pagi Bear is enjoying her “Kong” toy enrichment. and our zoo travelers are willing to pack such toys in their luggage for the trip.

Can you help out the bears at the Bornean Sun Bear Conservation Centre by purchasing an Extra Large “Kong” toy to send along with them?

You may purchase these and more on Amazon.com.  Just click here for the items specifically requested for the bears and make sure it will arrive by October 31st.  Thank you for caring about sun bears.

Have You Met our Beautiful African Elephants?

by | September 27th, 2013

zena-the-zookeeperDSC00426 [800x600]Did you know that Oakland Zoo is the only zoo in Northern California with African Elephants?  We have FOUR amazing African Elephants, three females and one male, and although they look similar, to us animal keepers their personalities are about as different as up and down.  As sweet and sour.  As football and bowling. As … well, you get the picture.

All of the girls come from Africa originally, but sadly, they became orphans and were sold to Zoos in the United States when their families were culled. Culling is the very controversial method of population management. They had sad and difficult beginnings in life, but now they all make one big happy family! We zookeepers do our very best to make sure of that each and every day – we love our elephants very much! All four have such unique and fun personalities, so what’s not to love?!

Osh, our only boy, is 19 and has been with us since 2004. He came from Howletts Wild Animal Park, where he was born with his family group. Young males in the wild get kicked out of their herd from ages 8-12, and that is what Osh’s mom and aunts started to do to him, so we gave him a home here at Oakland Zoo. Osh is extremely active, exploratory, and curious. He’s got a very lively and chipper walk, and he loves to play, browse and graze.

Donna is 34 years old and came to Oakland Zoo in 1989. She very quickly became the dominant female because she had the biggest attitude. She is the most playful out of the girls.  At nighttime you will find her having fun playing with the large tractor tires in her enclosure and charging into the pool for a cool-down! Personality-wise Donna is impatient, loves to participate in training, and is closely bonded with Lisa, whom she sleeps with every night. See how and why we train our elephants here!

Lisa is 36 years old and has been with us since she was two years old. She came from Kruger National Park in South Africa and went briefly to a “training” facility for several months then came to the zoo. Lisa is an ‘elephant’s elephant,’ she likes all of her pachyderm friends, and wants to make everyone happy. She loves her pool. We call her our water baby, because she will take daily dips if the weather is right! Want to see Lisa taking a bath? She is sneaky, agile, and can be very stubborn!

M’Dunda is 44 years old and came to us in 1991. She has a bad history of abuse at her previous facility; which is amazing because she is an extremely gentle soul and wouldn’t hurt a fly. She loves to play with Osh, and is often spotted at night leaning over the fence into Osh’s area, trunk-twirling with him. She can be a little insecure, and scared of new situations. When she first came here she wouldn’t eat her treat boxes! She sure does now, though! She also has long beautiful tusks.

All four of these wonderful beasts just love pumpkins, melons and pineapples. Come to our next “Feast For the Beast” event in the Spring and you can bring some produce and place them around the elephant habitat yourself!

Until next time, see you at the Zoo!

Supporting Elephants . . . Worldwide!

by | August 9th, 2013

WEDLOGODid you know that this Monday, August 12th is the second annual World Elephant Day? Here at Oakland Zoo we have been officially celebrating elephants for seventeen years with our annual ‘Celebrating Elephants Day’. This event gives the zoo the opportunity to increase awareness about elephant issues both in captivity and the wild, as well as raise money for the Amboseli Trust for Elephants. On a larger scale, increasing elephant issue awareness is exactly what World Elephant Day is intended to do, and elephants need your help more than ever. World Elephant Day is supported by the Elephant Reintroduction Foundation, located in Bangkok, Thailand. The day’s mission is “ to help conserve and protect elephants from the numerous threats they face; poaching, habitat loss, human-elephant conflict, and mistreatment in captivity.” The Foundation asks us to “experience elephants in non-exploitive and sustainable environments where elephants can thrive under care and protection.”

African Elephants are under increasing threat of extinction in ten years if we don’t act now and stop the ivory trade. In 1979 there were 1.3 million African elephants, now less than 400,000 remain, due to increasing greed of Asian markets. 35,000 were killed last year alone! The endangered Asian Elephant has been suffering from severe habitat loss and fragmented migration routes due to highways and industrial mono-crops (like palm oil). Less than 40,000 remain today.

elephantinpool

Our Osh, taking a bath in his pool

Captivity paints a much different picture. Asian elephants have been captured for centuries, being forced by their handlers to beg in the streets, give ride after ride to tourists, and be used as laborers to help haul logs to clear forests. Don’t let anyone fool you; Asian elephants are not domesticated animals! You’ll also see lots of Asian elephants in circuses, as well as some African elephants, being forced to perform painful tricks, and wear silly, degrading costumes for entertainment. An elephant wearing a tutu is not cute, nor does it create a connection with the general public. It is insulting to this majestic, magnificent, and intelligent species.  By the way, the circus is in town, so please, if you respect elephants as well as other species, do NOT attend the circus.

Hopefully by now, you’re asking what you can do to help!!

There are ways everyone can help, so please help TAKE ACTION! Here are just a few things to get you started:

Study elephants in their “keystone” role in the environment and inter-relationships with plants and animals from which it originates.

Support organizations that are working to protect elephants both in the wild and captivity . . . Amboseli Trust for Elephants, Save the Elephants, Performing Animal Welfare Society (PAWS), The Elephant Sanctuary in Tennessee . . . are just a few.

Do not support organizations that exploit or abuse elephants for entertainment and profit, such as the circus and the movie industry.

Do not ride an elephant . . . whether at the circus, at a park, or in another country. Elephants are not domesticated and were not meant to be ridden, they are wild animals. Saving these species, does not mean riding them. Watching them in their natural habitat participating in natural behaviors in the wild, such as a nice zoo, or PAWS, is being able to truly respect and appreciate them.

Sign online petitions that you come across that will help support elephant causes.

Be an elephant-aware consumer. Do not buy ivory products. Do not buy coffee that is not shade-grown or fair-trade, or products which contain palm oil.

Talk to a neighbor . . . all it takes is one conversation to possibly change someone’s mind if they are unaware of what is going on regarding the plight elephants.

Spread the word by blogging, and sharing links on Facebook and twitter.

Oakland Zoo is proud to be a part of this documentary that showcases the plight of elephants.

Oakland Zoo is proud to be a part of this documentary that showcases the plight of elephants.

Pick one of these actions above and help us TAKE ACTION on World Elephant Day. Try choosing a new action item each week and partake in the battle for

elephants worldwide!

Please join the March for Elephants taking place in San Francisco, on October 4, 2013 from 11am to 2pm beginning in Portsmouth Square. 25 cities worldwide will be participating in this march, all on October 4, to help take a stand for elephants and say NO to ivory. Please visit www.marchforelephantssf.org for more information on the upcoming march, how to be involved, and how you can help.

Chimps need YOU!

by | June 12th, 2013
Oakland Zoo Chimpanzee

Oakland Zoo Chimpanzee

In 2011, a petition was started by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA), Jane Goodall Institute (JGI) and the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS).  The petition requested that the United States Fish and Wildlife (USFW) agency reconsider its listing of chimpanzees under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).  At that time, Oakland Zoo put out a call to action from our members – and it worked!  This week, the USFW agency announced its proposal to reevaluate their listing!  This great news, but it is not a done deal.  The agency will take comments on the act from the public for the next 60 days and we need YOU to stand up for chimpanzees again!

Under current listing, wild chimpanzees are listed as endangered, giving them a significant amount of protection under U.S. law.  Captive chimpanzees are a different story.  They are listed as “threatened,” a much lesser designation with significantly fewer protections.  Chimpanzees are the only species that is double listed this way under the law and it is time for that to change.  Please show your support for chimpanzees by commenting in agreement with this changed designation.

Here’s How:

Go to the Federal eRulemaking Portal: http://www.regulations.gov. In the Search box, enter FWS–R9–ES–2010–0086, which is the docket number for this rulemaking. You may submit a comment by clicking on “Comment Now!” If your comments will fit in the provided comment box, please use this feature of http://www.regulations.gov, as it is most compatible with  our comment review procedures. If you attach your comments as a separate document, our preferred file format is Microsoft Word. If  you attach multiple comments (such as form letters), our preferred format is a spreadsheet in Microsoft Excel

Help Us Celebrate Elephants!

by | May 14th, 2013
Jeff Kinzley, Elephant Manager, educating families on what it takes to manage elephants.

Jeff Kinzley, Elephant Manager, educating families on what it takes to manage elephants.

The hustle and bustle of the holidays come and go, New Years resolutions are made (and accomplished of course!), roses and romance are in the air, and then by the time March comes all I can think about is Celebrating Elephants is almost here!!! You thought I was going to say the Easter Bunny didn’t you? For the past seventeen years, Oakland Zoo has put on this wonderful fundraiser to support African Elephant conservation, part of our duty as a zoological institution. All of the proceeds go to the Amboseli Trust for Elephants in Kenya, led by world-renowned researcher Cynthia Moss. Almost everything we know about African Elephants today is through her ongoing work. Cynthia has led a research team at Amboseli National Park for the past forty years, studying every aspect of these elephants lives; generations of births and deaths, droughts and rains, and unfortunately witnessing the ongoing devastation of the ivory trade. One of the most important aspects of the researchers being a part of the everyday lives of these elephants is that their presence in the park provides the elephants with some protection from ivory poachers. The researchers are able to work with the local villages as well as the rangers to help keep the elephants as safe as possible. Unfortunately with the uprising interest and value of ivory, along with corrupt government, an estimated 40,000 elephants are being poached every year throughout the continent. Therefore, we need to do everything we can to help stop elephants from going extinct, and that includes your support!!

SAM_1367 [800x600]

A glimpse of some of the beautiful auction items that are donated to support Amboseli Trust for Elephants.

Celebrating Elephants is held in two parts, the first is a family fun and adventure packed day which will be on Saturday, May 25th. This will include opportunities for families to visit an elephant up close, create treat box enrichment for the elephants to eat, do behavioral observations of the elephants on exhibit, as well as eat cotton candy and get their faces painted! This is our opportunity to increase awareness of the ongoing and increasing destruction of the ivory trade, as well as the cruelty of the circus. Kids will have the chance to see how we safely and humanely care for our elephants.

The second portion of the event will be an evening of h’ordeurves and spirits, accompanied by a silent auction and guest speaker on Friday May 17th. This year we have the great pleasure of welcoming friend and mentor, Ed Stewart, co-founder of the Performing Animal Welfare Society; a leader in animal welfare and rescue. Since 1984, PAWS has been at the forefront of efforts to rescue and provide appropriate, humane sanctuary for animals who have been the victims of the exotic and performing animal trades. Ed will share the interesting and heartwarming stories of the lives of the elephants living in the sanctuary of ARK 2000 in the San Andreas hills of California.

Over the past sixteen years we have raised over 200,000 dollars for the Trust. With support from zoo guests, volunteers, and staff we all work together to put on and have fun at an amazing event. We also could not be as successful without help from the zoo supporters, local businesses, and artists who make donations for our silent auction. This 17th year is dedicated to and in memory of Pat Derby, co-founder of Performing Animal Welfare Society, a dear friend and endless fighter for animal welfare and rescue. Please come join us for one or both events, and help us celebrate elephants with the respect, compassion, and awareness they deserve!  Visit the zoo website for more detailed information. http://www.oaklandzoo.org/Calendar_Item.php?i=402