Posts Tagged ‘ivory trade’

Global March for Elephants and Rhinos: Warriors needed!

by | September 12th, 2014

 

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Do you want to fight for the survival of elephants and rhinos? Do you want to say no to extinction? Do you want to march and rally? Please join the Global March for Elephants and Rhinos (GMFER), and be a warrior against the illegal wildlife trafficking trade! On Saturday, October 4th the world is coming together on World Wildlife Day to take a stand against the ivory and rhino horn trade in over one-hundred cities across the globe, including Africa, South America, Asia, and Australia!

Did you know that one elephant in Africa dies every fifteen minutes? And one rhino dies every nine hours? That’s 96 elephants and 2-3 rhinos a day. Considering the estimates for elephants are below 400,000 and rhinos below 18,000 in Africa, they don’t have much time left unless we come together in a global effort and ask for change. To read more about the crisis visit my blog here. Check out this video by conservationist and march supporter Dex Kotze, for more information on the trade.

Dozens of NGO's in support of the Global March for Elephants and Rhinos.

Dozens of NGO’s in support of the Global March for Elephants and Rhinos, including Oakland Zoo!

I have had the pleasure to be a part of March For Elephants, a San Francisco based grassroots organization, consisting of some of the most passionate and fierce advocates I have met, and who care deeply for the survival of elephants. This group of warriors has been working since February to raise awareness of the crisis and organize and advertise the upcoming march in San Francisco. The march was originally inspired in 2013 by the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, a non-profit dedicated to around the clock care of baby orphan elephants in Africa. DSWT has seen the dramatic increase of poaching in Africa, which has contributed to the massive increase in orphans that they are rescuing. DSWT supported about fifteen other cities who were marching across the globe, and so many other cities were inspired by their work and passion, over forty cities ended up marching last year, SF one of them! That momentum has not died and only continues to grow as elephants and rhinos are still in peril. Over one-hundred cities, and thousands of advocates are working fiercely on behalf of our beloved elephants and rhinos, and we anticipate the San Francisco turnout to be even bigger and better than last year! This year we have dozens of NGO supporters, including some of Oakland Zoo’s conservation partners, such as Amboseli Trust for Elephants. We have a great line-up of speakers including Ed Stewart, co-founder of Performing Animal Welfare Society, San Francisco Supervisor, Scott Weiner, and Jennifer Fearing of Humane Society of the United States.

Route for the march!

Route for the march!

Here’s what to do if you’re interested in attending the San Francisco march:

  • >Visit www.marchforelephants.org or www.march4elephantsandrhinos.org (for the global effort) to find out more information. On Saturday, October 4 at 10:30 am, the starting point is St. Mary’s Square in San Francisco. The march route will be about 2 miles long, and will end in the UN Plaza for the rally.
  • Sign up here. RSVP that you will attend, we’d love to know how many people are going!
  • Buy your special gear here. We want everyone looking snazzy. Proceeds go to the overall global effort. To donate to the SF march, click here.
  • Don’t forget to make your hand held sign to walk with during the march. For more ideas visit here. You can write whatever you want on the sign having to do with saving elephants and rhinos from extinction. For example: End the trade in ivory and horn! Save the elephants and rhinos! China, shut down your carving factories! We march to say no to extinction! Ivory belongs on elephants!

Please join Oakland Zoo in support of the Global March for Elephants and Rhinos. Say no to elephants turning into trinkets, jewelry, and status symbols. Say no to rhino horn being used as an alternative medicine or a hangover cure. Help us tell China to shut down their carving factories! Help us tell Vietnam that rhino horn has no proven medicinal or hangover cures! Ivory belongs on elephants, and only rhinos should have rights to their horns. Now let’s keep it that way!

Don't forget to make your sign for the march!

Don’t forget to make your sign for the march!

Can’t get enough of Oakland Zoo’s conservation efforts? Join us October 7th for the Discovering Primates Gala!

Featuring beautiful and exciting auction items including exclusive behind the scenes animal experiences, delectable bites, & bar. Our special guest is Rosamira Guillen, primate conservationist and Executive Director of Project Tamarin in Colombia.  This event benefits The Budongo Snare Removal Program in Uganda. This program helps chimps by removing snares set by poachers, offering goats as alternative sources of income for ex-hunters, and educating children and the community. It serves as a model to others! Oakland Zoo is the sole supporter.

 

Celebrating Elephants in 2014: A Sneak Peak

by | April 18th, 2014
All elephants are individuals and have very unique personalities. This is M'Dundamella, 45 years old with long beautiful tusks.

All elephants are individuals and have very unique personalities. This is M’Dundamella, 45 years old with long beautiful tusks.

Did you know that the elephant heart weighs 40-60 pounds and beats 30 times a minute? Did you know that the brain weighs 11 pounds and has a highly complex neocortex, a trait also shared by humans, apes, and dolphins? Did you realize that elephants exhibit a wide array of emotions and behaviors such as grief, learning, allomothering, mimicry, play, altruism, tool-use, compassion, cooperation, and self-awareness? These are just a few important facts about why we should care about elephants and why we need to fight for their survival. Advocacy, education, and conservation are key concepts to protecting elephants and this is what Oakland Zoo is all about!!

We would like to invite you to our 18th annual Celebrating Elephants events, on May 17th and 24th. All of the proceeds of these two days go directly to the Amboseli Trust for Elephants in Kenya, to protect the elephant herds in Amboseli National Park. ATE’s forty year research project, founded by world-renowned researcher Cynthia Moss, has made many important contributions to elephant research and the knowledge gained has profoundly altered the way we think about, conserve, and manage elephant populations. Their research has highlighted the ethical implications of dealing with sentient, long-lived, intelligent, and socially complex animals and their knowledge base provides powerful and authoritative support to elephant conservation and advocacy campaigns worldwide.

A sneak peak into the Amboseli elephants . . .

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The AA family drinking. The first identified herd of the Amboseli Elephant Research Project in 1972.

Besides tail hair length, tusk length, and size (all changing characteristics) elephants are typically identified by the notches, holes, rips, and tears in their ears, most of which are caused by walking through thorny brush. At Amboseli, elephants are identified by these ear notches and named and categorized by the alphabet, most often, unless a truly unique characteristic defines them. Therefore, the first family Cynthia Moss studied were known as the AA’s on September 1st, 1972, the very first day of the study. From that day, over forty years of observations and data has been collected on them and many other herds. Elephants are extremely social and live in fission-fusion matriarchal societies, constantly joining together and breaking apart depending on environmental conditions and available resources. Sometimes, when conditions are optimal elephants will form what is known as an aggregation and come together to socialize, play, touch, rest, drink, mud, dust, and eat. These aggregations typically average 300-400 individuals, but Cynthia has counted as many as 550 at one time! Read up about more Amboseli elephants here, http://www.elephanttrust.org/.

 

Vicki Fishlock, Resident Scientist at Amboseli, will speak about her studies at our evening event and silent auction on May 17th.

To learn more about these magnificent, majestic beings join us Saturday evening on May 17th, for a special presentation by Dr. Vicki Fishlock, Resident Scientist for the Amboseli Trust for Elephants. Dr. Fishlock joined the research team in 2011 to study the social resilience of female elephants following a devastating drought in 2009. She will share some of her findings in her ongoing research looking at the fascinating social dynamics in the lives of female elephants, and how these individual relationships shape the success of families. She will explain how age, experience, and leadership influence the survival of calves and families in the sometimes difficult life of an elephant. Come hear stories of success and struggle of the magnificent elephants of the Amboseli Plains. The lecture will be followed by a wonderful reception including drink and appetizers, amongst a lovely silent auction, so get ready to bid! Here’s a link to more details about the event http://www.oaklandzoo.org/Calendar_Item.php?i=800.

 

 

Join us the following Saturday, May 24th, for a day of fun and celebrating how special elephants are!

Keeper Gina working with African elephant

Keeper Gina working with African elephant

Family friendly activities will include exciting elephant stations such as touching gigantic elephant bones, making treat boxes for the elephants to eat, holding an eleven pound tooth, and stepping into an elephant-sized footprint. Grab binoculars and participate in a mock research camp where observers are invited to watch and record behaviors, and they can learn how to identify our elephants! Also watch the amazingly talented Circus Finelli, an animal free circus. And don’t forget to experience the once-a-year opportunity behind the scenes to see where the elephants sleep, watch an elephant pedicure, and see how the zookeepers train with them to conduct their husbandry care. This day is also an important opportunity for the staff to explain the differences of elephant management and why you shouldn’t go to or support the circus.

This year Celebrating Elephants will be in honor of Wildlife Conservation Society’s 96 Elephants campaign, named for the 96 elephants that are poached in Africa every day for their tusks.  In December of 2013 Oakland Zoo officially teamed up with the campaign to take action in helping fight the illegal ivory trade through public awareness and taking action through California legislation to change policy against selling and trading ivory.

Read my blog (http://www.oaklandzoo.org/blog/author/ggambertoglio/) or go to our website to find out more details on the campaign and how you can help!

Welcome Oakland Zoo's new partnership with the Wildlife Conservation Society's 96 Elephants Campaign to raise awareness.

Welcome Oakland Zoo’s new partnership with the Wildlife Conservation Society’s 96 Elephants Campaign to raise awareness.