Posts Tagged ‘SB 1062’

World Elephant Day 2016: Help Oakland Zoo #fightthecrime!

by | July 13th, 2016

World Elephant Day is a day to recognize all things elephant! Oakland Zoo is renowned for the conservation and advocacy work we do on behalf of elephants and this is a day to celebrate them.

Zoo campers learning about tusks and why 96 elephants a day are dying for them.

Zoo campers learning about tusks and why 96 elephants a day are dying for them.

Elephant staff will be tabling in front of the elephant exhibit to share all of our good efforts to visitors. The table will include artifacts, such as ivory tusks, so that visitors may learn about elephants being poached in the wild, our most recent legislative efforts on SB 1062 and AB 96, and information on our conservation partners. Also included will be action items where kids will get to color in an elephant coloring page to take home and share, and families will take an elphie in front of our elephant “crime scene” to #fightthecrime. Guests are encouraged to wear grey and will be given a special “96” pin, on behalf of the 96 elephants a day that are being poached in Africa. March for Elephants will also be tabling and handing out information regarding this year’s Elephant March in San Francisco, on September 24th.

In the meantime here’s a little history and a brief update of what’s been happening on the elephant front.

World Elephant Day 2014 and still going! Visotors were given special hand made pins made by Oakland Zoo staff in honor of the 96 elephants a day that die for their tusks.

World Elephant Day 2014 and still going! Visitors were given special hand made pins made by Oakland Zoo staff in honor of the 96 elephants a day that die for their tusks.

Oakland Zoo joined Wildlife Conservation Society’s “96 Elephants” campaign back in 2013 and it’s been quite the wild ride of success. In the fall of 2012, Colleen Kinzley, Director of Animal Care, Conservation, and Research, and staff attended a WCS lecture in San Francisco. John Calvelli, WCS Executive Vice President of Public Affairs was the key-note speaker, introducing the 96 Elephants campaign. In January of 2013 we set up a phone call to talk to the “96” team to set up a partnership, letting them know we were on board and ready to take action for elephants. They’ve kept us busy ever since!

Shortly after that initial phone call, we were already talking about introducing legislature to California to

Oakland Zoo in collaboration with WCS, NRDC, March for Elephants, and HSUS, along with dozens of constituents work to pass AB 96.

Live from the Capitol! Oakland Zoo in collaboration with WCS, NRDC, March for Elephants, and HSUS, along with dozens of constituents work to pass AB 96.

ban ivory sales. After two years of meetings, community and visitor outreach and education, getting hundreds of signatures, letters, and drawings to our governor, and a few trips to Sacramento, that dream became a reality. In October of 2015, AB 96 was passed into law (all types of ivory including mammoth, as well as rhino horn), and it was just early July of this year when the law came into effect. California was the third state to ban the sales of ivory after New Jersey and New York), and since then WCS has worked and collaborated on passing laws in Washington and Hawaii. WCS also had us rally for the most recent federal ban on ivory sales, meeting the goal of sending over one million messages to be heard. Under the leadership of President Obama’s Wildlife Trafficking Task Force, we will now not allow ivory into the United States, with very few exceptions (unfortunately this does not include mammoth ivory). Here are the specifics on the federal regulations: https://www.fws.gov/international/travel-and-trade/ivory-ban-questions-and-answers.html.  Please know that the reason why state bans are so important is because the federal ban does not prevent trade WITHIN a state.

 

Since my last update (http://www.oaklandzoo.org/blog/2015/07/31/oakland-zoo-supports-world-elephant-day/), even more action has been happening on the conservation front worldwide.

  • June 2015: WCS, including several other conservation organizations and 3 government agencies hosted an ivory crush in Times Square.
  • August 2015: World Elephant Day across the nation generated three times more media outreach than the previous year.
  • September 2015: President Xi of China and President Obama announced a joint commitment to fight against wildlife trafficking and close domestic ivory trade
  • October 2015: Oakland Zoo staff and volunteers march in San Francisco for the Global March for Elephants and Rhinos. The day of the march Governor Brown vetoes SB 716, the CA bill to ban the bullhook. The day after the march Governor Brown signs AB 96, the CA bill to ban ivory sales.
  • April 2016: Kenya hosts the largest ivory burn in history of over 100 tons of confiscated ivory. Since 2011 there have been at least 19 ivory crushes/burns. Click here to see more detail: http://96elephants.tumblr.com/post/145306232045/thanks-to-your-help-elephants-are-a-little-safer
  • May 2016: Cynthia Moss is the keynote speaker at Oakland Zoo’s Celebrating Elephants evening gala. Both day and evening events raised over $50,000, a record year
  • June 2016: United States announces a nationwide ban on ivory sales.

 

Here’s the most recent results from the Great Elephant Census to give us a more complete look at how Africa’s different elephant populations are doing http://www.greatelephantcensus.com/map-updates :

The Great Elephant Census. Efforts being made across the continent to estimate current elephant populations, something that hasn't been done in over 40 years.

The Great Elephant Census. Efforts being made across the continent to estimate current elephant populations, something that hasn’t been done in over 40 years.

It was reported that Tanzania has lost at least 60% of it’s population, and Mozambique at least 48% in recent years (these are the main areas in red in East Africa).  It’s important to remember that every country in Africa is different when it comes to wildlife trafficking and how they value their wildlife. We cannot paint the entire continent the same when it comes to these issues, although as a world issue we all need to come together to take action and create change.

What’s going on with the bullhook ban SB 1062?

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Team SB 1062 (originally SB716) to ban the use of the bullhook in California. OZ staff providing outreach and expert testimony.

As you may remember last October Governor Brown vetoed SB 716. This bill would have charged criminal penalties to those using bullhooks on elephants, but because of the governors concerns with adding more criminal law to our penal code, SB 716 was vetoed. Working with California Fish and Game, HSUS, Oakland Zoo, and Performing Animal Welfare Society, created SB 1062. This bill addresses the governors concerns with the criminal law and creates civil penalty with fines and possible revocation of a permit to have an elephant in California. This law would be written into the Fish and Game code. Recently, SB 1062 has passed the Assembly Appropriations Committee and will next be up for the full Assembly Floor vote. Oakland Zoo has provided expert testimony in several committee hearings the last two years, efforts crucial to the bill’s passing, as well as hours of lobbying state offices.

Join Oakland Zoo for World Elephant Day on Friday, August 12th and take action for elephants! Help us #fightthecrime (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1__6JrJ609I).

 

Elephant Care, Action, and Beyond!

by | June 17th, 2016
Protected Contact training with target poles. Photo Gina Kinzley.

Protected Contact training with target poles. Photo Gina Kinzley.

Here at the Oakland Zoo we have a strong belief and value system when it comes to animal welfare. We do everything we can to provide our animals with what they need, including space with the appropriate substrates, social dynamics, as well as enrichment and training for both physical and mental stimuli. Everything we do takes into consideration the health and well-being of the animal as well as the safety of the keeper. Wild animals can be dangerous and in no way should be treated like a pet. We work with them in a protected contact type of management to ensure our safety and theirs. You might be thinking why does the animal need to be safe? Aren’t you the one in danger? The answer is yes. I am in danger should I walk into an enclosure and right up to an animal, but for me to be able to do that involves punishment toward the animal. If you have been to a circus before you have seen all the different animals they work with up-close and personal. This is not because the animals enjoy being in the circus and close to their handlers; this is because the animals are forced and mistreated to behave as asked.

Since I am an elephant keeper, let’s talk about elephants specifically. Working with the largest land mammal on earth is a challenge. People

Donna, mudding in the grassy meadow on a rainy day. Photo Gina Kinzley.

Donna, mudding in the grassy meadow on a rainy day. Photo Gina Kinzley.

think they are gentle giants but more often they are and always have the potential to be extremely dangerous. For decades these intelligent creatures have had to put up with being in the circus where their handlers have abused them into submission, beating them with what is called an “ankus” or “bullhook”. When you see the handlers inside the enclosure working directly with the elephant, this is called free contact. This management relies on negative reinforcement and punishment. The ankus, similar in look to a fireplace poker, was and is specifically designed to cause pain, and for the elephant to move away from the two sharp points of the hook. When an elephant does not comply with the asked behavior the pressure of the sharp points is increased, which often times leads to striking and clubbing with the hook. Twenty five years ago an alternative system was created.

IMG_2425In California, bullhooks are not used at any zoo accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums or at the Performing Animal Welfare Society sanctuary. Instead, this alternate system is called Protected Contact. This style uses positive reinforcement, and trainers are always protected by a barrier whether it be spatial or with fencing. When we ask our elephants to do something they are reinforced with food treats and praise. This keeps us and the elephants safe. When we are training we stand outside the fence line and use target poles, which are a long piece of bamboo or rake handle with a soft tip, to target a part of the body that we need. The keepers or trainers are not dominant over the elephant, and if the elephant chooses not to participate then they have the choice to walk away from the session. Fortunately elephants are extremely food motivated and using their healthy diet they are willing to help the trainers with the care they need. Under Oakland Zoo’s management, the elephants at Tembo Preserve (http://www.tembopreserve.org/index.html) will be trained using the same management style. The Preserve will provide three heated elephant barns of approximately 26,000 square feet each, which will include various protected contact walls, with the first phase including one barn that can service up to 12 elephants, providing shelter from cold weather and facilities for veterinary care and basic husbandry training. Also, throughout the vast and spacious habitat, these training walls will be available to be able to access the elephants at a distance from the main barn when needed.  Most of our training is for husbandry and health purposes, but we do fun stuff as well such as catching a

Donna, playing with a tire for fun. Photo Gina Kinzley.

Donna, playing with a tire for fun. Photo Gina Kinzley.

stick in the trunk or picking up an object when thrown. Fun stuff is okay as long as it is not strenuous on the elephants. A lot of the behaviors you might see in the circus such as legs stands are taxing on the joints and in the long term can cause arthritis. Although rarely observed in the wild to reach a branch or dig up a root, elephants are not meant to do these behaviors repetitively every day. At our facility we can accomplish anything we train, such as foot care, blood draws, ultrasounds, and beyond. I would rather see an elephant out on 6.5 acres grazing and browsing and interacting freely with one another, than standing next to me in fear, wearing some silly outfit, chained and confined in box cars and parking lots and performing tricks for profit. So, please support the Oakland Zoo and let elephants be elephants! Don’t go to the circus, the cruelest show on earth! Support your local non-animal circus’ such as Teatro Zinzanni and Cirque de Soleil.

SB 1062 team. From left to right, Ed Stewart, Gina Kinzley, Jennifer Fearing, Catherine Doyle, Dr. Joel Parrott.

SB 1062 team. From left to right, Ed Stewart, Gina Kinzley, Jennifer Fearing, Catherine Doyle, Dr. Joel Parrott.

SB 1062, a California bill which would ban the use of the bullhook would be the first of it’s kind. Oakland Zoo, along with Performing Animal Welfare Society, and Humane Society of the United States are working to pass this bill. Public opinion regarding the use and treatment of captive elephants is rapidly evolving in the direction of increasing protection for them. The cities of Los Angeles and Oakland have prohibited the use of bullhooks, and San Francisco has banned the use of elephants, among other animals, in performances of any kind. Numerous other jurisdictions across California and the U.S. have similar restrictions in place and more are considering such actions. Today, no county fair in California offers elephant rides (run by operators who use bullhooks), in response to community concerns about animal welfare and public safety. Even Ringling Bros. and Barnum and Bailey Circus has ended their elephant acts and their last show with elephants was in May 2016. California is poised to become the first state

Osh browsing. Photo Gina Kinzley.

Osh browsing. Photo Gina Kinzley.

in the nation to end the abusive treatment of elephants caused by the use of outdated and inhumane bullhooks. SB 1062 would effectively protect elephants, while sending a strong message to the rest of the country that cruelty to elephants must not be tolerated. SB 1062 has already passed the Senate and will be heard on Tuesday, June 14th in the Assembly Water, Parks, and Wildlife Committee. Stay tuned on Oakland Zoo’s Facebook page for updates on the bills progress. Here’s detailed info about the bill: http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/cgi-bin/postquery?bill_number=sb_1062&sess=CUR&house=B&author=lara_<lara>.

 

Cynthia Moss, founder of Amboseli Trust for Elephants, at the 20th Annual Oakland Zoo Celebrating Elephants.

Cynthia Moss, founder of Amboseli Trust for Elephants, at the 20th Annual Oakland Zoo Celebrating Elephants.

A huge thank you to those of you that attended our Annual Celebrating Elephants Fundraiser. We have raised more than 300,000 dollars over the past twenty years and all of the proceeds go toward world renowned elephant researcher Cynthia Moss’ Amboseli Trust for Elephants, protecting African Elephants through conservation and research. We had the privilege of having Cynthia herself as our guest speaker at the silent auction and lecture. She gave us an update on the thriving Amboseli population of elephants and the research ATE is currently working on. The house was packed with the most people we have ever had attend and we had a record breaking year, raising over $50,000.