Posts Tagged ‘wildlife education’

Which new conservation project will you vote for?

by | February 7th, 2013

Quarters for Conservation is an exciting new initiative launched in August of 2011. Each time a visitor comes to the Oakland Zoo, twenty five cents is donated to one of the zoo’s Conservation Field Partners. Visitors vote for their favorite of three different projects at the conservation voting station in Flamingo Plaza. Be sure to use your token and spare change to vote each time you visit.

Announcing the new 2012-2013 Quarters for Conservation Projects! We are so very excited to support these projects and get to know them better this year.

Protect the Puma, our Local Lion

We share our world with a beautiful keystone species, the puma! These native cats, also known as mountain lions, are in crisis, as habitat and movement corridors are increasingly invaded by human development. Pumas are also being killed by cars and depredation permits (issued when livestock or pets are attacked). The time is now to research and better understand these apex predators and their vital role in our ecosystem.

The Bay Area Puma Project, the first long-term study of mountain lions in the San Francisco bay area, works to track and record pumas, discovering their range, movement, feeding patterns and the effects of human development on puma populations. The Bay Area Puma Project aims to utilize this research to develop new conservation strategies and engaging educational programs to foster a healthy co-existence between humans and this magnificent local lion.

Care for the Malayan Sun Bear

Able to climb some of the world’s tallest trees with the help of its four inch claws, the Malayan sun bear is facing many threats to its survival. Clear cutting for logging and palm oil plantations destroys vital habitat, and poaching for the trade in bear parts kills adult bears and leaves cubs orphaned. Many of these cubs end up in the illegal pet trade, destined to live their lives in small bare cages, never to see the sky or feel the forest floor beneath their feet.

The Bornean Sun Bear Conservation Centre rescues and cares for bears in need,   providing lifelong care for some and striving to return others to the wild. Through public awareness and expansion of the sanctuary, the Centre is making a vital difference in the effort to save this extraordinary bear!


Conserve Central American Wildlife

Illegal wildlife trafficking, often for the pet industry, has a devastating impact on animal welfare, species conservation, and ecosystems. Second to habitat loss, it is a major cause of species extinction. Many smuggled animals die in transit, and those that survive need constant care and attention.

The ARCAS Wild Animal Rescue Center was created by Guatemalan citizens in order to rescue, rehabilitate and release animals confiscated from smugglers operating in the Maya Biosphere Reserve. The ARCAS Rescue Center is now one of the largest rescue centers in the world, receiving between 300 and 600 animals of more than 40 species per year.  Thanks to ARCAS, animals such as parrots, scarlet macaws, spider and howler monkeys, ocelots, jaguars and coatimundis, have a chance to live free and fulfill their natural role in the Mayan forest.

We are so very proud of our three wonderful projects. Good luck to them, and happy voting to all the wonderful Oakland Zoo  visitors.

Zoo Visitors Save Wildlife!

by | January 11th, 2013

On a hot August day in 2011, visitors to the Oakland Zoo became much more than visitors, they became wildlife heroes!  Each time a visitor entered the zoo, a twenty-five cent conservation donation was contributed in support of several Oakland Zoo conservation projects. With thousands of visitors each year, these quarters have added up to a significant help for animals.  Our slogan for Quarters for Conservation project is “Saving Wildlife with Each Visit” and it has proven true.

Kids swirl their tokens to save wildlife

Guests even determined where the funding went. Each visitor was able to vote for their favorite project out of our featured three with their token they received at the gate and their spare change.

Zoo visitors love Quarters for Conservation for many reasons: the opportunity to teach children about voting, the chance to learn about wildlife conservation, the feeling of pride in their visit, and their ability to easily help the species they have grown to love. Zoo staff also experienced an increase in pride in their job, and the animals in the wild benefited most of all. Here are the results:

From August 2011- September 2012, Quarters for Conservation raised $102,499!

50% of Quarters for Conservation went to our three featured projects and was divided by visitor votes.

There were 222,722 votes total.

38% went to Amboseli Fund for Elephants for total of $19,475

Amboseli Trust for Elephants funds vital research in Kenya

36% went to The Budongo Snare Removal Project for a total of $18,450

The Budongo Snare Removal project protects chimpanzees from hunters, like this chimp named “Oakland”.

26% went to Ventana Wildlife Society’s Condor Recovery Project  for a total of $13,325

 

Condors now soar above Big Sur thanks to the work of the Ventana Wildlife Society.

25 % of Quarters for Conservation went to various Oakland Zoo Conservation Field Partners, decided by the Conservation Committee:

 

EWASO Lion Project                                     $2000

Giraffe Conservation Foundation            $5000

Project Golden Frog                                      $1500

Animals Asia                                                      $1500

Hornbill Nest Project                                      $1500

Lubee Bat Conservancy                                  $5000

Africa Matters                                                     $1500

Bay Area Puma Project                                   $2500

Bornean Sunbear

Conservation Centre                                       $2500

ARCAS                                                                   $2500

American Bird Conservancy                         $100

The remaining 25% went to on-site conservation at the zoo, such as our work with condors and western pond turtles.

Here is what zoo visitors had to say about our first year of Quarters for Conservation:

  • I feel good that I am helping wildlife
  • It makes sense that we should all contribute
  • I’m glad I chose this zoo
  • Quarters for Conservation makes the zoo a better place
  • This donation enhances my experience at the zoo
  • I did my good deed for the day!

Here is what some of our conservation field partners had to say:

“The greatest threats condors face in California are ingestion of lead, primarily from spent ammunition, and eggshell thinning caused by past DDT discharges into the marine environment.  The Oakland Zoo’s Quarters for Conservation program is assisting Ventana Wildlife Society with both of these issues and is an excellent example of how a zoo can directly recover endangered animals in the field through partnerships and engaging their visitors.”

Kelly Sorenson, Director – Ventana Wildlife Society

“The unique opportunity that Oakland Zoo has given us is the long term vision of saving chimpanzees by eliminating the threat of hunting. It has been a truly amazing story of a project that simply started as a snare removal campaign but led to the development of wildlife clubs in schools and provision of nanny goats for the ex-hunters associations. We would like to thank Oakland Zoo staff and visitors for believing in our initiatives. Together we should be proud that we piloted a scheme that has yielded dividends beyond our expectations.”

Fred Babweterra of The Budongo Snare Removal Project

“The Amboseli Trust for Elephants just received their Quarters for Conservation donation from the Oakland Zoo and it made us very happy indeed. We were thrilled that the public voted for the money raised to go to elephants, specifically ATE. We will use these funds to help protect and to continue to learn more about the Amboseli elephants. Thank you Oakland Zoo and all the people who care for wildlife.

Cynthia Moss, Founder Amboseli Trust for Elephants

As a community, we have a great power to not only enjoy the zoo and learn from the animals, but to genuinely help their plight in the wild. Quarters for Conservation represents a true shift in the way the Oakland Zoo and our fantastic visitors engage with animals. We celebrate the wildlife hero in us all.

Red Hot Deals on Summer Programs Now!

by | August 3rd, 2012

In case you haven’t heard, Oakland Zoo is offering a limited time discount on many of its popular community programs. From now until the end of August, you can get a 25% off when you sign up for Zoomobile and ZooSchool presentations. It turns out that there is extra space on the Zoo’s event calendar this summer, so we’re offering this great deal. And, summer is the perfect time to schedule a fun-filled animal presentation for your school, camp, or youth group.

What sort of fun is awaiting with Oakland Zoo community program? For starters, there’s our Zoomobile program, which has been a big hit  for many years. With the help of one of our experienced Education Specialists, you’ll get the opportunity to see a variety of small animals up-close  and personal at your school, library or home. You’ll learn how these fascinating creatures live and how they fit into the wondrous web of life. You’ll even get the chance to touch these animals: everything from turtles, lizards and snakes, to hedgehogs and chinchillas—even cool giant millipedes.  Zoomobile is a great way to learn about animals in a fun, informal setting.

And with the ZooSchool program, you bring your class or group to the Zoo for a full day of adventure. Your Education Specialist will greet you and escort you to a classroom where they will introduce the special theme of your presentation. Then you’ll venture out into the Zoo to explore and see our many exotic animals on a guided tour. Afterwards, you return to the classroom to wrap up and review the day’s activities. After your program has ended, you can head back into the Zoo to eat a picnic lunch or go back to visit animals until your departure time. ZooSchool gives your class or group a great way to experience Oakland Zoo.

Programs are offered Monday through Friday from 10am – 3pm. Presentations are designed for a wide range of age groups: from pre-K through 8th grade, as well as programs geared specifically for seniors. Registrations will be taken on a first come/first served basis until all the spaces are filled. It’s easy to book one of our popular animal-themed programs and take advantage of these great savings. Contact our Education Reservations Associate at 510-632-9525 x220. See you at the Zoo! Oakland Zoo…It’s Your Zoo.

Discover a New Species of Birthday Parties!

by | August 5th, 2011

Hey parents! Your kid’s birthday’s coming up, isn’t it? You need to plan that party. But maybe you’re tired of the same old bounce castle and party game routine. Perhaps you’ve been trying to think of a new and unique way to help them celebrate their birthday this year. With the Oakland Zoo’s ZooMobile program, you can give your child a memorable birthday party that he or she will be talking about with their friends for a long time to come. After all, how often do you get to touch wild animals in your own home?!

Great Horned Owl

Accommodating a group of up to 25 people, the Oakland ZooMobile comes to your own home with several kid-size critters for a fun, educational experience that your child and his friends will love. Led by one of the Zoo’s experienced education specialists, this entertaining and informative program lasts a full 45 minutes. This allows plenty of time to see, touch and learn about four or five of our animals, such as hedgehogs, chinchillas, lizards, snakes and cool big bugs. There’s always an interesting mix of native and exotic species. As our School Programs Manager, Sarah, likes to say, “We try to bring you one fuzzy, one prickly, one scaly and one buggy.” Specific themes are also available. If you like, you can request an all-reptile presentation (Hooray for Herps), Creatures of the Night, Amazing Adaptations, or one that deals exclusively with the fascinating world of insects, such as walking sticks, millipedes and tarantulas (Invertebrate Invasion).

Bearded Dragon

With the kids seated in a circle, the animals are brought out one at a time. Here, in a comfortable home setting, the kids learn about the physical adaptations that make each of these animals successful, the kinds of things that they eat and various behaviors that they display. Everyone who’s interested will have the opportunity to touch each of them. There’s also plenty of time for the kids to ask any questions they might have. Our enthusiastic, knowledgeable staff members are always ready to share their love of animals with everyone.

But there’s more. Included in the presentation is a gift bag filled with animal-themed items for each child in attendance as well as a special gift for the birthday

Touching a Turtle

child.

So if this sounds like a great new way to celebrate your child’s birthday, sign up today for a ZooMobile birthday party in your own home. Who knows, someone in that crowd of little faces who’s touching a wild animal for the first time may be a future zookeeper or wildlife scientist!

For more information, including fees and other policies, please check out the Birthday ZooMobile webpage on the Oakland Zoo website.

 

 

 

Zoo-to-Community Is Spreading Its Wings

by | November 4th, 2010

There’s Big News happening with the Zoo-To-Community program (ZTC) here at the Oakland Zoo. The program just received its first big grant for schools outside of Oakland! Since its inception three years ago, the Zoo-To-Community (ZTC) program has offered vouchers for free Zoo admission and access to programs such as ZooSchool, ZooMobile, ZooSchool Discovery and Zoo field trips to local residents who might not otherwise be able to afford them.

ZTC Kids at the Zoo

And now, thanks to the generosity of the East Bay Community Foundation, funds are available to reach West Contra Costa County. That’s definitely good news for Richmond Title 1 elementary schools, (where 75% or more of the kids are on the free lunch program) child development centers, and Head Start schools. Head Start, as you may know, is a national program that promotes school readiness. The Title 1 program provides funding to school systems for students at risk of failure and living at the poverty level.

During these last three years, ZTC has been steadily expanding. Through the use of mailings to school principals, the word has been spreading, and more schools have been getting involved. Participation has quadrupled in the last year alone, enabling the program to reach an impressive 16,000 people, including 13,000 school-age children.

Grants from donor organizations are a big part of the Zoo-To-Community program. In a typical year, ZTC receives half a dozen such grants, ranging from $2,000 to $15,000 a piece, from supporters such as First 5, Bechtel, Clorox, Wells Fargo, The Junior League, and the Rogers Foundation. So the East Bay Community Foundation’s grant for $ 15,000 represents a substantial part of ZTC’s financial backing for the year.

Up Close with a Turtle

What all this financial business boils down to is this: last year we had the most funding ever for bus transportation. Up

Touching a Hedgehog

till now, the biggest headache for ZTC– the one thing that’s kept the program from achieving its full potential has been transportation. Oakland is one of the few major cities that doesn’t have its own school bus system. Even with free Zoo admission, many people simply had no way to get here. So the program’s resources weren’t being fully utilized. But now, thanks in large measure to the East Bay Community Foundation’s Grant, that’s all changing.

All of this is exciting news for Zoo-To-Community Coordinator Sarah Powers, who has derived great satisfaction from being able to offer the benefits of the Oakland Zoo to a whole new segment of the East Bay community. Ms. Powers, who’s been in charge of ZTC for the past year and a half, says she looks forward to continued expansion of the Zoo-To-Community program in both Alameda and Contra Costa Counties. So if you’re eligible for ZTC, get on the bus and check out the Oakland Zoo!